drop out

(redirected from drop-outs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Encyclopedia.

drop out

1. verb To fall or spill out of something. I didn't realize that I hadn't fully zipped my backpack until my books started dropping out of it.
2. verb To break and/or plunge suddenly. This usage typically refers to the bottom of something. The bottom dropped out of the paper bag once it got wet. If the bottom drops out of the stock market, we could have another Great Depression ahead of us.
3. verb To let someone or something fall or proceed out of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Drop the troops out of the plane once you're safely over the compound. Of course the boys got into mischief and started dropping each other's things out the window.
4. verb To eliminate or exclude something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Something is wrong with the sound system because it's dropping out every third word.
5. verb To be eliminated. Something is wrong with the sound system because every third word is dropping out.
6. verb To abandon society and conventional values, as due to disillusionment with them. After surviving a serious illness, my sister dropped out and bought a house in the country instead of going back to her corporate job.
7. verb To leave an activity or program without finishing it. I'm going back to school because I always regretted dropping out of college.
8. noun One who has left school before graduation. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word. I'm going back to school because I always regretted being a college dropout.
See also: drop, out

drop out

 (of something)
1. . Lit. to fall out of something. One by one, the skydivers dropped out of the plane. The marshmallows dropped out of the bag.
2. Lit. or Fig. [for the bottom of something] to break loose and drop. The bottom dropped out of the box, spilling everything everywhere. The bottom dropped out of the stock market, and we lost a lot of money.
3. Fig. [for someone] to resign from or cease being a member of something; [for someone] to leave school. Sally dropped out of school for some unknown reason. But why did she drop out?
See also: drop, out

drop out

Withdraw from participation in a group such as a school, club, or game; also, withdraw from society owing to disillusionment. For example, He couldn't afford the membership dues and had to drop out, or She planned to drop out from college for a year. [Late 1800s]
See also: drop, out

drop out

v.
1. To fall out of something: My card must have dropped out of the bag at some point.
2. To make or let something or someone fall out of something: I dropped the stones out of the window.
3. To withdraw from participation in something, as a game, club, or school: The committee is trying to determine why so many students were dropping out. I dropped out of algebra because it was too hard. I dropped history out of my schedule this term.
4. To withdraw from established society, especially due to disillusionment with conventional values: My cousin dropped out and moved to the tropics.
5. To omit something: This computer drops out the semicolons. The old stereo drops the bass out.
6. To be omitted: When words are contracted, some sounds or letters drop out.
See also: drop, out

drop out

1. in. to withdraw from a conventional lifestyle. Sometimes I just want to drop out and raise pigs or something.
2. in. to drop out of school or some organization. Don’t drop out of school. You’ll regret it.
3. and dropout n. someone who has dropped out of school. Dropouts may find it very hard to get a job.
See also: drop, out

dropout

verb
References in periodicals archive ?
The EC announce they are undertaking measures to reduce the number of high-school drop-outs to 10% (from the current 14.4%) in the next ten years.
"Many of them have been forced to leave school," she added, expressing regret that the number of school drop-outs has increased.
There are additional obstacles placed before students in danger of becoming drop-outs. Recently, in its apparent wisdom, state educational "experts" have decreed more challenging math and science courses for all students.
A drop-out is a person aged 20-24 who is neither attending school, nor has a high school diploma.
The Nursing Standard, which obtained the data under the Freedom of Information Act, said even by conservative estimates the drop-out rate was costing the NHS about pounds 57 million a year.
Hamilton's nine previously underperforming elementary schools are now outperforming 90 percent of Tennessee's schools; 77 percent of the district reads at or above the appropriate level, and the high school drop-out rate is down while achievement levels are up.
No significant difference (p<.05) between project participants and drop-outs was found for their level of comfort with using computers for developing instructional materials as self-reported during the application process.
The current smokers saw themselves as mean, lazy, rule-breakers, and potential drop-outs, and wanted to tell others about their illicit activities.
Turns out that thousands of students who should have been recorded as drop-outs had been swapped to other categories, such as "transferred" or "moved." Across this school district once led by U.S.
For video recording applications, the local spare areas represent a discontinuity in the video data stream that may cause video drop-outs when the video is played back on a low cost video player.
The educational system led to many drop-outs and failures.
EDUCATION Secretary David Blunkett will this week unveil multi- million pound plans to rescue a "lost generation" of teenage drop-outs.
But it's not so much the money as the gratification, according to a number of "business drop-outs" looking for a new life and the chance to be one's own boss--at least in the kitchen.
They blamed single motherhood for many of the nation's woes, ranging from school drop-outs and drive-by shootings all the way to the deficit.
From that beginning has sprung a daycare centre, an urban farm, a community education centre (running afterschool and holiday programmes for local kids, activity days for schools, clubs for young people and classes for adults), two community theatre groups, an annual carnival, a community newspaper, a book of local history and a secondary school for drop-outs whose examination results rival those of most Birmingham schools.