drop out

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drop out

1. verb To fall or spill out of something. I didn't realize that I hadn't fully zipped my backpack until my books started dropping out of it.
2. verb To break and/or plunge suddenly. This usage typically refers to the bottom of something. The bottom dropped out of the paper bag once it got wet. If the bottom drops out of the stock market, we could have another Great Depression ahead of us.
3. verb To let someone or something fall or proceed out of something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Drop the troops out of the plane once you're safely over the compound. Of course the boys got into mischief and started dropping each other's things out the window.
4. verb To eliminate or exclude something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "out." Something is wrong with the sound system because it's dropping out every third word.
5. verb To not be amplified, broadcast, or delivered to a receiver, typically due to some kind of connection problem. Something is wrong with the sound system because every third word is dropping out. I have to call my phone company because my calls keep dropping out. Back when we had dial-up, the connection would drop out when we got an incoming call.
6. verb To abandon society and conventional values, as due to disillusionment with them. After surviving a serious illness, my sister dropped out and bought a house in the country instead of going back to her corporate job.
7. verb To leave an activity or program without finishing it. I'm going back to school because I always regretted dropping out of college.
8. noun One who has left school before graduation. In this usage, the phrase is often written as one word or hyphenated. I'm going back to school because I always regretted being a college dropout.
See also: drop, out

turn on, tune in, drop out

A slogan urging people to experiment with psychedelic drugs, especially LSD, in order to perceive the world in new ways and challenge the natural order of society. Popularized by the psychologist Timothy Leary in the 1960s. A: "I'm worried Tom might be getting into drugs." B: "A lot of kids go through a 'turn on, tune in, and drop out' phase, especially during college. I'm sure he'll grow out of it."
See also: drop, out, tune, turn
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

drop out

 (of something)
1. . Lit. to fall out of something. One by one, the skydivers dropped out of the plane. The marshmallows dropped out of the bag.
2. Lit. or Fig. [for the bottom of something] to break loose and drop. The bottom dropped out of the box, spilling everything everywhere. The bottom dropped out of the stock market, and we lost a lot of money.
3. Fig. [for someone] to resign from or cease being a member of something; [for someone] to leave school. Sally dropped out of school for some unknown reason. But why did she drop out?
See also: drop, out
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

drop out

Withdraw from participation in a group such as a school, club, or game; also, withdraw from society owing to disillusionment. For example, He couldn't afford the membership dues and had to drop out, or She planned to drop out from college for a year. [Late 1800s]
See also: drop, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drop out

v.
1. To fall out of something: My card must have dropped out of the bag at some point.
2. To make or let something or someone fall out of something: I dropped the stones out of the window.
3. To withdraw from participation in something, as a game, club, or school: The committee is trying to determine why so many students were dropping out. I dropped out of algebra because it was too hard. I dropped history out of my schedule this term.
4. To withdraw from established society, especially due to disillusionment with conventional values: My cousin dropped out and moved to the tropics.
5. To omit something: This computer drops out the semicolons. The old stereo drops the bass out.
6. To be omitted: When words are contracted, some sounds or letters drop out.
See also: drop, out
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

drop out

1. in. to withdraw from a conventional lifestyle. Sometimes I just want to drop out and raise pigs or something.
2. in. to drop out of school or some organization. Don’t drop out of school. You’ll regret it.
3. and dropout n. someone who has dropped out of school. Dropouts may find it very hard to get a job.
See also: drop, out

dropout

verb
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
There are additional obstacles placed before students in danger of becoming drop-outs. Recently, in its apparent wisdom, state educational "experts" have decreed more challenging math and science courses for all students.
On the other hand, the Premier said the national indicators of children's well-being have improved, mainly through strengthening the system of medical coverage, speeding up efforts to mitigate the mortality rate among mothers and children at birth, widespread vaccination in rural and urban areas, as well as by promoting education in rural areas and fighting drop-outs.
He said that after the GCE OL and AL there are a large number of drop-outs, and there are catering to these drop outs, as well as premature school drop outs and others.
The country further has a serious issue with school drop-outs a 38% of Bulgarians do not graduate a most of them leave as early as elementary school leading to increased unemployment and poverty risk.
Summary: TRIPOLI: After ministerial efforts failed to cut the number of school drop-outs, civil-society organizations have taken over the role of helping failing students stay in school.
1998: David Blunkett announced plans to pay school drop-outs an allowance to tempt them back into education.
Fulham join group winners Roma plus the likes of Champions League drop-outs Juventus, Liverpool and Atletico Madrid in the last 32 of the tournament after their well-deserved 3-2 victory over FC Basle on Wednesday.
I don't want my taxes to go to waste on these drop-outs. Thousands of these abusing wasters are already receiving handouts because they are too idle to go to work.
Everton face a difficult test at Fiorentina, who sit fourth in Serie A, while Rangers and Bolton have it even tougher against Champions League drop-outs Werder Bremen and Sporting Lisbon respectively.
On early school drop-outs, the EU has set itself the target that by 2010, not more than 10% of people aged 18-24 will leave school with only lower secondary education or even less.
FORCING pupils to stay at school till the age of 18 unless they get a job with training could cut the number of drop-outs, a Coventry councillor says.
Indeed, studies continue to show that this movement away from building neighborhood-scale schools toward focusing on large, remotely located ones results in a variety of concerning trends such as: lower student test scores; lower student attendance; higher student drop-outs; worse student health; and higher overall school district costs.
For the article entitled "Association of Inosine Triphosphate 94C>A and Thiopurine S-Methyltransferase Deficiency with Adverse Events and Study Drop-Outs under Azathioprine Therapy in a Prospective Crohn Disease Study", by N.
Intricately detailing the lives of the two high-school drop-outs and the short-lived friendship between the two, Malcolm And Jack opens readers to the reality of the post-war fifties and the pretensions mentality of American's the era neared revolution.
* 71% of all high school drop-outs and 85% of all children with behavioral disorders come from single parent families.