drop off

(redirected from drop-offs)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus.

drop off

1. verb To leave someone or something at the destination to which one has transported it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "off." When do I need to drop the kids off at soccer practice? I'll come to your house tonight and drop off your cake pan.
2. verb To happen less often than is normal or typical. Is Kelly mad at me? We used to talk all the time, but our conversations have really dropped off lately.
3. verb To decline significantly. Don't sign that defenseman—his play has really dropped off as he's gotten older. That business had to close after sales dropped off sharply.
4. verb To release someone or something from one's grasp (and let it fall) from a particular place (which is listed after "off"). In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drop" and "off." We dropped rocks off the bridge and listened to them splash into the river. My daughter likes when I drop her off the ledge into the pool.
5. verb To fall asleep quickly and/or easily. If you turn on the baby's mobile, she'll drop off without a fuss.
6. verb To die. At least grandpa just dropped off in his sleep, rather than after some long illness.
7. noun A significant decline. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Don't sign that defenseman—there's been a real drop-off in his play as he's gotten older. That business had to close after suffering a major drop-off in sales.
8. noun A precipitous descent. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. We aren't experienced enough skiers to go down a drop-off like that and survive!
9. noun A place where someone or something is left or delivered. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Where is the drop-off for clothing donations?
10. adjective Describing a place were someone or something can be left or delivered. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Where is the drop-off box for clothing donations?
See also: drop, off

drop someone or something off something

 and drop someone or something off
to let someone or something fall from something; to make someone or something fall from something. They dropped the feather off the top of the building. Jake dropped off a feather and it fell to the ground.
See also: drop, off

drop someone or something off

 (some place)
1. . Lit. to let someone or a group out of a vehicle at a particular place; to deliver someone or something some place. Let's drop these shirts off at the cleaners. Let's drop off Tom and Jerry at the hamburger joint.
2. Fig. to give someone or a group a ride to some place. Can I drop you off somewhere in town? I dropped off the kids at the party.
See also: drop, off

drop off (to sleep)

Fig. to go to sleep without difficulty; to fall asleep. I sat in the warm room for five minutes, and then I dropped off to sleep. After I've eaten dinner, I can drop off with no trouble at all.
See also: drop, off

drop off

 
1. . Lit. [for a part of something] to break away and fall off. The car's bumper just dropped off—honest. I lifted boxes until I thought my arms would drop off.
2. Fig. to decline. Attendance at the meetings dropped off after Martin became president. Spending dropped off as the recession became worse.
See also: drop, off

drop off

1. Fall asleep, as in When I looked at Grandma, she had dropped off. [Early 1800s]
2. Decrease; also, become less frequent. For example, Sales have dropped off markedly, or Over the year her visits dropped off. [Early 1800s]
3. Deliver, unload, as in Bill dropped off the package at the office.
4. Die, as in He is so ill he could drop off any time. [Early 1800s]
See also: drop, off

drop off

v.
1. To fall off something: The box must have dropped off the back of the truck.
2. To cause something to fall off something: The hiker dropped the rock off the cliff's edge.
3. To deliver something to some place: Drop those DVDs off at the video store on your way home. We'll drop off the gifts at your house later.
4. To decline: Sales dropped off in December.
5. To fall asleep: The movie was so dull that I dropped off for a while.
See also: drop, off
References in periodicals archive ?
While the actual amount has varied from month to month, the average amount of glass taken to the drop-off centers from January to July was 48.28 tons per month.
The city did the math to make sure these numbers weren't caused by more recycling overall being taken to the drop-off centers.
The M.E.N spoke to passengers at the airport yesterday paying the charge to use the drop-off bays.
Hackney drivers, meanwhile, have been boycotting the terminals in protest against their T3 rank being moved 'out of sight' to make way for the new drop-off bays.
Alternatively motorists can use a free drop-off area and catch a shuttle bus to the correct terminal - the free zones will be the current Jetparks 1 site, which is near to Terminal 2, and the journey will be around 10 minutes.
I pointed out that the CEO had clarified that this was allowed but he was adamant and insisted that drivers get fined if they make more than one drop-off. We were forced to take two separate taxis, despite living just a short distance away from each other.
Detecting drop-offs may also be influenced by ergonomic factors, such as the type of cane tip (Kim, Wall Emerson, & Curtis, 2010b) and length of the cane (Rodgers & Wall Emerson, 2005).
We used the 50% absolute drop-off detection threshold and drop-off detection rates to measure the participants' detection of drop-offs (the dependent variables).
If cane users rely more on proprioceptive/ kinesthetic perception to detect drop-offs when using the two-point touch technique and rely more on vibrotactile perception to detect drop-offs when using the constant contact technique, differential deterioration of proprioceptive/kinesthetic and vibrotactile sensitivities may indicate possible interaction between a cane user's age and the type of cane technique used in drop-off detection.
This study used a mixed-measures design with block randomization, in which the participants used either the two-point touch technique or the constant contact technique to detect drop-offs of various depths.
At Coventry Airport, the drop-off zone was closed while extra checks were carried out on vehicles booked into the long-stay car park.
Al Ali said: "If four people decide to ride together in a cab on the same route, but will get off at four different points, the taxi driver is not permitted to stop the meter and restart the meter at every drop-off. The meter has to be running and the person getting down at the last point will pay the driver the entire journey fare."
Training may also affect a cane user's detection of drop-offs, since it can generally improve human perceptual abilities (Platt & Racine, 1985; Recanzone, Merzenich, & Jenkins, 1992; Van Boven, Hamilton, Kauffman, Keenan, & Pascual-Leone, 2000).
In addition, some orientation and mobility (O&M) specialists have stated that it takes longer for many cane users to become competent in detecting drop-offs with the two-point touch technique than with the constant contact technique (R.
- Non-Blue Badge holders who have booked special assistance will have to use the drop-off zone, where they will be able to contact the airport's assistance firm OCS