drive at (something)

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drive at (something)

To allude to some point or topic or orient one's discussion of something toward a particular conclusion. What exactly are you driving at with a critical statement like that? If you have a problem with my work, just tell me.
See also: drive

drive at something

to be making a point; to be hinting at something; to work up to making a point. What are you driving at? What's the point? I could tell Mary was driving at something, but I didn't know what it was.
See also: drive

drive at

Mean to do or say, as in I don't understand what he's driving at. Today this idiom, first recorded in 1579, is used mainly with the participle driving.
See also: drive

drive at

v.
To mean to do or say something; have something as a point: I don't understand what you're driving at—just tell me what you mean.
See also: drive
References in classic literature ?
But he liked them; liked that mad driving at twelve miles an hour, liked upsetting a driver or running down a pedestrian, and flying at full gallop through the Moscow streets.
The young men with brain injuries selected for this study had, with varying degrees of success, already returned to driving at the time of the study.
Driving Survival' is a reference book for everything from potentially dangerous situations, such as driving at night or handling breakdowns, to consumer information, such as buying a safer car or coping with road rage.