drive (one's) pigs to market

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drive (one's) pigs to market

To snore. I can't get any sleep with Will driving his pigs to market every night—I think it's time for him to see a doctor about his snoring.
See also: drive, market, pig
References in classic literature ?
He used to take her away to their room in the west ell, and talk over his business with her all evening.
It was according to the old saying, "Give a nigger an inch and he'll take an ell.
To use his own words, further, he said, "If you give a nigger an inch, he will take an ell.
The first target was to be placed at thirty ells distance, and all those who hit its center were allowed to shoot at the second target, placed ten ells farther off.
The trumpet sounded again, and a new target was set up at forty ells.
Her whole time was spent in making patchwork quilts with knitting-needles that were an arshin [An ell.
Rapunzel had magnificent long hair, fine as spun gold, and when she heard the voice of the enchantress she unfastened her braided tresses, wound them round one of the hooks of the window above, and then the hair fell twenty ells down, and the enchantress climbed up by it.
That we, who are gentlemen, content ourselves with a doublet of cloth at sixteen sols the ell, of Paris.
Broad was Robin across the shoulders, but broader was the stranger by twice the breadth of a palm, while he measured at least an ell around the waist.
After bein' in ell for fifteen days--an' now e wants us to sail this floatin' ell to sea again?
My indulgent mother bought me, yesterday, at a merchant's in Cheapside, three new shifts, that cost fourteen pence an ell, and I am to have a pair of new stuff shoes, for my Lord of Norfolk's ball, which will be three shillings.
Number two--seven ells of red Turkey cloth and nine ells of cloth of gold.
mutton better than an ell of fried stock-fish; and the first
John Richardson of Newcastle to his dear cousin Jemmy Cole, in London, with an account that he sent by such a vessel (for I remembered all the particulars to a title), so many pieces of huckaback linen, so many ells of Dutch holland and the like, in a box, and a hamper of flint glasses from Mr.
A homely proverb recognises the existence of a troublesome class of persons who, having an inch conceded them, will take an ell.