drive at (something)

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drive at (something)

To allude to some point or topic or orient one's discussion of something toward a particular conclusion. What exactly are you driving at with a critical statement like that? If you have a problem with my work, just tell me.
See also: drive

drive at something

to be making a point; to be hinting at something; to work up to making a point. What are you driving at? What's the point? I could tell Mary was driving at something, but I didn't know what it was.
See also: drive

drive at

Mean to do or say, as in I don't understand what he's driving at. Today this idiom, first recorded in 1579, is used mainly with the participle driving.
See also: drive

drive at

v.
To mean to do or say something; have something as a point: I don't understand what you're driving at—just tell me what you mean.
See also: drive
References in periodicals archive ?
By designing in compatibility with SATA drives at the connector level, investments in technology are protected.
"Hitachi has been at the forefront of SAS and 4 Gb/s Fibre Channel development and has been testing and demonstrating prototype drives at numerous industry events in the past year," said Manjeshwar Bhat, general manager, Enterprise HDD Business Unit, Hitachi Global Storage Technologies.
But with improved product construction and increased engineering fervor on the part of manufacturers, today's specifications now rival those of SCSI and Fibre Channel drives at 1 million hours.
Library security also ensures that rogue servers can't see any of the drives at all," said Art Bitts, Cummins Senior Systems Engineer.
SATA drives also have a lower price than SCSI drives, and they incorporate some of the enterprise features of SCSI drives at a lower cost.
Two tape drives cut the backup window in half because two servers can back up their data to two separate tape drives at the same time.
For pricing, the 80-slot library was priced at $33,375, two tape SDLT drives at $5,800 each and 80 100GB native capacity cartridges at $120 each.
Gartner/Dataquest pinned the installed base of DDS tape drives at 6.2 million by the end of 2000 with more than 1.5 million of those units shipped that same year.
With high-performance disk drives that can sustain up to 40MB/sec, a gigabit interface cannot support three drives at their maximum throughput.
Throw in Tandberg Data's SLR 50 and some interesting drives at the lower price range and it looks like a real fight is brewing.
Quantum will be able to offer SDLT drives without the legacy reader components and should be able to offer such drives at a reduced price.