driven


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be (as) pure as the driven snow

To be virtuous and/or chaste. The bride looked as pure as the driven snow in her gown. Kate would never cheat on an exam—she's pure as the driven snow.
See also: driven, pure, snow

drive (a/the/something's) price down

To cause the price of something to decrease. I'm worried that having that dilapidated old building right next door has driven my house price down.
See also: down, drive, price

drive (a/the/something's) price up

To cause the price of something to increase. Having this fancy new restaurant in our neighborhood should drive all of our house prices up.
See also: drive, price, up

drive (one) to despair

To cause one to experience sadness, hopelessness, and/or frustration. I'm not surprised that his wife's death has driven him to despair—grief has that effect on people. Try not to let this rejection drive you to despair.
See also: despair, drive

drive a coach and horses through (something)

To expose the flaws in something, such as a statement, argument, or belief. Primarily heard in UK. The suspect had said he wasn't there that night but then drove a coach and horses through that idea with today's contradictory statement.
See also: and, coach, drive, horse, through

drive a hard bargain

To arrange a transaction so that it benefits oneself. Sal is known to drive a hard bargain, so I doubt you'll get that car for the price you want.
See also: bargain, drive, hard

drive at (something)

To allude to some point or topic. What exactly are you driving at with a critical statement like that? If you have a problem with my work, just tell me.
See also: drive

drive away

1. To leave some place in a vehicle. Once my parents had driven away, I called all of my friends and invited them over.
2. To transport someone or something from some place in a vehicle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "away." Can we call Animal Control to drive away the raccoons that we've trapped?
3. To entice someone or something to leave some place. What can we do to drive away these troublesome raccoons?
See also: away, drive

drive back

1. To return to some place by driving. It only took us an hour to get here, but with all of this traffic, how long will it take us to drive back? Hey, will any of you guys be driving back to campus soon?
2. To transport someone or something back to some place in a vehicle. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "back." Can any of you guys drive me back to campus soon?
3. To force someone or something to move away from someone or something else. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "back." The ringmaster used a whip to drive the lion back. This tactic should help us to drive back the enemy troops.
See also: back, drive

drive between

To travel between two places or things. How long do you think it will take you to drive between the warehouse and the first delivery of the day?
See also: drive

drive down

1. To drive to a place further south than one's current location. We're planning to drive down to Florida and thaw out from the Boston winter.
2. To drive someone or something to another location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "drive" and "down." I can't leave for the beach until Saturday—can you drive me down? Mom is going to drive all of that stuff down to campus next weekend.
3. To cause something to decrease quickly. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can used between "drive" and "down." That dilapidated old house has driven down house prices in our neighborhood.
See also: down, drive

drive down (a/the/something's) price

To cause the price of something to decrease. I'm worried that having that dilapidated old building right next door has driven down my house price.
See also: down, drive, price

drive home

1. verb To return home by car. When do you plan to drive home from the party?
2. verb To drive someone to their house. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "home." Can any of you guys drive me home after the student council meeting? I'll drive her home, don't worry, Mrs. Smith.
3. verb To emphasize something. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "home." The nightly news always drives home the presence of danger in our city and makes my anxiety worse.
4. noun The ride to one's house. You can sleep on the drive home—it'll take five hours, after all. The traffic jam made my drive home twice as long as normal.
See also: drive, home

drive in(to)

1. verb To enter a particular place or thing in one's vehicle. Turn left and then drive into the parking garage.
2. verb To hit someone or something while driving. That guy fell asleep at the wheel and drove into a crowd of people at the parade. I lost control of my car and drove into a row of shopping carts.
3. verb To force something into another material or substance by hitting it. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "in" or "into." To drive this nail into the wall, you really need to put some muscle behind it.
4. verb In baseball, to hit the ball and cause a runner (or runners) to score. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "in." And with that triple, Green drove in two runs.
5. noun An outdoor movie theater in which people sit in their cars before a large screen. This phrase can also be used as an adjective to describe such a theater. The phrase is typically hyphenated in this usage. I wish there were more drive-ins around here—watching a movie in your car with your family can be a lot of fun.
6. adjective Describing the part of a business designed to serve customers seated in their cars. The phrase is typically hyphenated in this usage. Here's the order for the guy that's waiting at the drive-in window.
See also: drive

drive into a corner

1. Literally, to force someone or something to move into a corner. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "into." To assert his dominance, the cat drove the kitten into the corner.
2. To force or be forced into a difficult or unpleasant situation that one cannot easily resolve or escape. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "into." My boss really drove me into a corner when he asked me to fire the CEO's daughter. Scott has been driven into a corner with this mortgage payment that he cannot afford.
See also: corner, drive

drive off

1. To leave some place in a vehicle. Once my parents had driven off, I called all of my friends and invited them over.
2. To force or entice someone or something to leave some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "off." What can we do to drive these troublesome raccoons off our property?
3. To hit a golf ball off of something, typically a tee. Yeah, but I can hit it further than you if I drive off the tee.
See also: drive, off

drive on

1. To keep driving. How much longer should we drive on before stopping for the night?
2. To encourage one to persist in some task or goal. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "on." The desire to set a good example for my kids drove me on to finally complete my college degree.
See also: drive, on

drive out

1. To travel by vehicle to some location. When do you guys plan to drive out here?
2. To force or entice someone or something to leave some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "out." What can we do to drive these troublesome raccoons out of our yard?
See also: drive, out

drive over

To drive to another location that is not too far away. We could walk to the restaurant, but because it's cold out, let's just drive over.
See also: drive, over

drive through

1. verb To travel through a particular area in a vehicle. I can't believe I drove through the whole town before realizing that I'd made a wrong turn.
2. noun The lane outside a business that is designed to serve customers seated in their cars. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated and spelled "drive-thru." Does that coffee shop have a drive-thru? I don't want to get out of the car in this rain.
3. adjective Describing such an establishment or thing. In this usage, the phrase is often hyphenated and spelled "drive-thru." Does that bank have a drive-thru ATM? I don't want to get out of the car in this rain.
See also: drive, through

drive up

1. verb To drive to a place that is north of one's current location. I do live in Florida now, but I'm actually driving up to New York this weekend to visit my family.
2. verb To drive someone to a place that is north of one's current location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "up." I do live in Florida now, but I have to drive my sister up to New York this weekend.
3. verb To drive a particular vehicle to a place that is north of one's current location. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "up." My sister recently moved to New York, so I'm driving her car up there this weekend.
4. verb To reach a destination by car. I'm sorry I didn't meet you outside—I didn't hear you drive up.
5. adjective Describing an establishment or place with an outdoor lane designed to serve customers seated in their cars. In this usage, the phrase is usually hyphenated. Does that bank have a drive-up ATM?
See also: drive, up

drive a hard bargain

to work hard to negotiate prices or agreements in one's own favor. All right, sir, you drive a hard bargain. I'll sell you this car for $12,450. You drive a hard bargain, Jane, but I'll sign the contract.
See also: bargain, drive, hard

drive away

to leave some place driving a vehicle. They got in the car and drove away. They drove away and left us here.
See also: away, drive

drive back

to go in a vehicle back to where it started. Mary drove back and parked the car where it had been when she started. You drive us there and I'll drive back.
See also: back, drive

drive between

something and something else; to go in a vehicle between things or places. I can't drive between work and home in less than thirty minutes. The cab driver drove between the airport and downtown more than twelve times in one day.
See also: drive

drive down

(to some place ) to go in a vehicle to a relatively lower place or to a place in the South. We are going to drive down to Houston for the weekend. We were going to fly to Florida, but it will be nice to drive down.
See also: down, drive

drive off

to leave somewhere, driving a vehicle. She got in her car and drove off. Please don't drive off and leave me!
See also: drive, off

drive on

to continue driving; to continue with one's journey. We drove on for a little while. The traffic jam is breaking up, so we can drive on.
See also: drive, on

drive out

(to some place) to go in a vehicle to a place that is away from one's home, away from a city, etc. We drove out to a little place in the country for a picnic. Why don't you drive out this weekend? We would love to have you here.
See also: drive, out

drive over

(to some place) to go in a vehicle to some place that is neither close by nor far away. Let's drive over to Larry's place. Yes, let's drive over. It's too far to walk.
See also: drive, over

drive someone down

(to some place) to transport someone to some place (as in town or away from home), or to a relatively lower place or to a place in the south. She drove herself down to the hospital. We have to drive Andrew down to school in the fall.
See also: down, drive

drive someone into a corner

 
1. . Lit. to force someone into the place where two walls intersect. They drove him into a corner and captured him there. When he is driven into a corner, he will fight.
2. Fig. to force someone into a position or state where there are few choices and no escape. You have driven me into a corner, so I guess I have to give in. Todd was driven into a corner when everyone disagreed with him.
See also: corner, drive

drive someone on (to something)

to make someone move onward toward some kind of success. She said her parents drove her on to finish law school. They drove on their daughter to great things. The thought of earning a large salary drove him on.
See also: drive, on

drive someone (or an animal) away

(from something or some place) to repel someone or an animal from something or some place. We drove the monkeys away from the pineapples. We drove away the monkeys from the fruit.
See also: away, drive

drive someone (or an animal) out

of something and drive someone or an animal out to force or chase someone or an animal out of something or some place. We drove them all out of the country. We drove out the troublesome kids.
See also: drive, out

drive someone or something back

to force someone or something away; to force someone or something to retreat. The infantry drove the attackers back into the desert. They drove back the invading army. We drove them back to the border.
See also: back, drive

drive someone or something off

to repel or chase away someone or something. The campers drove the cows off before the animals trampled the tents. They drove off the cows.
See also: drive, off

drive someone up

(to some place ) to transport someone to a place on a higher level or to a place in the north. Ralph drove Sally up to the cabin. He was going to drive her up last week, but could not.
See also: drive, up

drive something down

(to some place) to transport a vehicle to a place by driving it there. I will drive the car down to the college and leave it there for you. I'll drive down the car and meet you. Do I have to drive the car down? Can't you fly up here and get it?
See also: down, drive

drive something home

(to someone) Fig. to emphasize an important point about something (to someone). The teacher repeated the point three times just to drive it home. I hope this really drives the importance of safety home to you. The accident drove home the importance of wearing seatbelts to everyone concerned.
See also: drive, home

drive through

(something) to go in a vehicle from one side of something to the other; to pass through something while driving. We drove through some nice little towns on the way here. We didn't stop. We just drove through.
See also: drive, through

drive up

(to some place) to arrive some place in a vehicle. She drove up to the door and stopped. Sally drove up and honked.
See also: drive, up

*pure as the driven snow

pure and chaste. (Often used ironically. *Also: as ~.) Jill: Sue must have gone to bed with every man in town. Jane: And I always thought she was as pure as the driven snow. Robert was notoriously promiscuous, but tried to convince all his girlfriends that he was pure as the driven snow.
See also: driven, pure, snow

*white as a sheet

 and *white as a ghost; *white as snow; *white as the driven snow
[of someone] extremely pale, as if frightened. (*Also: as ~.) Marilyn turned as white as a sheet when the policeman told her that her son had been in a car wreck. Did something scare you? You're white as a sheet! Jane made up the bed with her best linen sheets, which are always as white as snow. We have a new kitten whose fur is white as the driven snow.
See also: sheet, white

drive a hard bargain

Be severe in negotiating a transaction, make an agreement to one's advantage. For example, It's more than I planned to pay, but you drive a hard bargain. This expression, first recorded in 1836, uses the verb drive in the sense of "forcefully carry through."
See also: bargain, drive, hard

drive home

Make clearly understood, make a point, as in The network news programs drive home the fact that violence is part of urban life. This expression uses the verb drive in the sense of "force by a blow or thrust" (as in driving a nail). Samuel Hieron used it in Works (1607): "That I may ... drive home the nail of this exhortation even to the head."
See also: drive, home

pure as the driven snow

Morally unsullied, chaste, as in She's just sixteen and pure as the driven snow. This simile dates from the late 1500s, although driven, which means "carried by the wind into drifts," was occasionally omitted. It is heard less often today.
See also: driven, pure, snow

white as a sheet

Very pale in the face, as in She was white as a sheet after that near encounter. This simile, dating from about 1600, survives despite the fact that bedsheets now come in all colors.
See also: sheet, white

white as a sheet

or

white as a ghost

If someone looks as white as a sheet or as white as a ghost, they look very pale because they are frightened, shocked or ill. When I saw him his face was as white as a sheet and he was crying. She was as white as a ghost and trembling all over.
See also: sheet, white

pure as the driven snow

completely pure.
When used of snow, driven means that it has been piled into drifts or made smooth by the wind. The phrase was famously parodied by the actress Tallulah Bankhead in 1947 : ‘I'm as pure as the driven slush’.
See also: driven, pure, snow

drive a hard ˈbargain

make sure that you always gain an advantage in business deals, etc: I wouldn’t try to do business with Jack; he’s got the reputation of driving a hard bargain.
See also: bargain, drive, hard

be driven, pushed, etc. from ˌpillar to ˈpost

be forced to go from one person or situation to another without achieving anything: Vast numbers of refugees have been pushed from pillar to post in that area.
See also: pillar, post

(as) pure as the driven ˈsnow

(often humorous) innocent or morally good: I don’t think you’re really in a position to criticize her. You’re hardly as pure as the driven snow yourself!
See also: driven, pure, snow

drive away

v.
1. To leave a place in a vehicle: We got in our car after the party and drove away.
2. To take someone or something away in a vehicle: The farmer drove the puppies away to their new home. The police drove away the criminals in their van.
3. To repel someone or something: We drove the bugs away with insect repellent. The smell drove away trespassers.
See also: away, drive

drive down

v.
1. To drive a vehicle downward, southward, or along some path: We drove down to Florida for winter break. They drove down the street in the van.
2. To drive some vehicle downward, southward, or along some path: My sister drove my car down to Florida. She drove the motorcycle down the road.
3. To cause something to decrease rapidly: The increase in supply drove down the costs. The ongoing war drove travel down.
See also: down, drive

drive off

v.
1. To leave a place in a vehicle: I got in my car and drove off.
2. To repel someone or something: We drove the bugs off with fly swatters. The police drove off the angry crowd with tear gas.
3. To hit a golf ball off something, especially a tee, at the start of a hole: I drove off the tee and ended up in a sand trap.
See also: drive, off

drive out

v.
1. To force someone or something to leave some place: The rising cost of rent drove the tenants out. The pesticide drove out the insects.
2. To travel to some destination in a vehicle: We might drive out to the country this weekend. I was driving out toward Denver when the blizzard hit.
See also: drive, out

drive up

v.
1. To arrive at a destination in a vehicle: I was standing in front of the house when they drove up.
2. To drive a vehicle upward, northward, or along some path: We drove up the mountain. The fire engines were driving up the street.
3. To drive some vehicle upward, northward, or along some path: Let's drive the van up to Canada. We were driving our new sports car up the street.
4. To cause something to increase rapidly: The scarce supply of oil is driving up prices. The interest in the new toy drove up sales.
See also: drive, up
References in classic literature ?
Meanwhile the Argives were neither driven towards their ships by Mars and Hector, nor yet did they attack them; when they knew that Mars was with the Trojans they retreated, but kept their faces still turned towards the foe.
This coachman, Peter by name, is seventy years old, and was born on the place, and has driven its occupants for fifty years, and I am nearly as fond of him as I am of the sun-dial; indeed, I don't know what I should do without him, so entirely does he appear to understand and approve of my tastes and wishes.
Hartford Depot, but before we'd driven a hundred yards she pulled the check-string and ordered me to go to the Waldorf.
The DVR has driven up the demand for high capacities so that today drives are available with up to 400GB--which can record up to 400 hours of standard TV and more than 40 hours of high-definition video.
JVC's decision to use hard drives as a means of storage on its new Everio camcorders was driven by consumer demand for greater portability and storage capacity and more flexibility in data manipulation.
These markets were initially being driven by White Box VARs and System Builders looking for ways to compete with the branded storage solutions.
According to Quantum chairman and CEO Michael Brown, difficult conditions in the desktop disk drive business today are being driven by two distinct phenomena occurring simultaneously.
All current helical scan products utilize a dual hub driven cassette/cartridge and a rotating multi-channel recording head.