drive off


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drive off

1. To leave some place by driving; to drive away. Once my parents had driven off, I called all of my friends and invited them over.
2. To force or entice someone or something to leave some place. In this usage, a noun or pronoun can be used between "drive" and "off." What can we do to drive these troublesome raccoons off our property? I'll drive off those ruffians, don't you worry.
3. To hit a golf ball off of something, typically a tee. Yeah, but I can hit it farther than you if I drive off the tee.
See also: drive, off

drive someone or something off

to repel or chase away someone or something. The campers drove the cows off before the animals trampled the tents. They drove off the cows.
See also: drive, off

drive off

to leave somewhere, driving a vehicle. She got in her car and drove off. Please don't drive off and leave me!
See also: drive, off

drive off

v.
1. To leave a place in a vehicle: I got in my car and drove off.
2. To repel someone or something: We drove the bugs off with fly swatters. The police drove off the angry crowd with tear gas.
3. To hit a golf ball off something, especially a tee, at the start of a hole: I drove off the tee and ended up in a sand trap.
See also: drive, off
References in periodicals archive ?
I'm disgusted that someone could just drive off when they'd obviously hit something.
Officers will be using mobile ANPR equipment to monitor motorists at petrol stations which are known to have problems with "bilkings" - people who drive off without paying for fuel.
A DRUNK tried to drive off in a police car which had been left unattended with the engine running but was foiled by a special immobiliser, a court heard yesterday.
A MOTORIST was stabbed by a man who tried to drive off in his car at the Albert Dock at 3.45am.
She said: "This can only be a good thing and the aim has got to be to put the wind up people who drive off without paying.
A PETROL station boss has installed a police-style stinger to puncture the tyres of people who drive off without paying.
A 12-year-old schoolboy who raped his teacher and then stole her car to drive off in is being sentenced today.
The High Court in Glasgow heard Linda Hardie, 48, had been in a shop in Ballieston and was about to drive off when Ryan pounced.
This is the term used for drivers who fill up their car with fuel then drive off without paying.
The shocked victim managed to drive off but stopped further down Cubbington Road.