drip

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drip in

To slowly trickle some kind of liquid into something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drip" and "in." Just drip the food coloring in so that you don't add too much of it. I dripped in the melted butter a little bit at a time, until it was emulsified with the egg yolks completely.
See also: drip

drip in(to) (something)

1. To slowly trickle into something, as of a liquid. There must be something wrong with the faucet because water is still dripping into the sink.
2. To slowly trickle something into something. Just drip the food coloring into the cake batter so that you don't add too much of it.
See also: drip

drip with (something)

1. Literally, to be overly saturated with some liquid. The dryer must be broken because the clothes were still dripping with water when I took them out. If you let him, Billy will add syrup to his pancakes until they're dripping with it.
2. By extension, to clearly display some quality or attitude. This usage is usually used to describe one's speech. Well, I don't believe her because her voice was dripping with sarcasm when she said it.
See also: drip

drip in

(to something ) [for a liquid] to fall into something drop by drop. The water dripped into the bowl we had put under the leak. Is the water still dripping in the bathtub?
See also: drip

drip something into something

 and drip something in
to make something fall into something drop by drop. Alice dripped a little candle wax into the base of the candlestick. Don't pour it all into the jar. Drip in a little at a time.
See also: drip

drip with something

 
1. . Lit. to be heavy or overloaded with something to the point of overflowing. The foliage dripped with the heavy morning dew. Her clothing dripped with seawater as she climbed back onto the deck.
2. Fig. [for someone's speech] to show certain states of mind or attitudes. Her voice dripped with sarcasm. The old lady's voice dripped with sweetness and affection.
See also: drip

drip

n. an oaf; a nerd. Bob is a drip, I guess, but he’s harmless.
References in periodicals archive ?
DRIP Investor Publisher Chuck Carlson also provides free to new subscribers the Directory of Dividend Reinvestment Plans--the bible of the industry.
Essentially, participating in a DRIP is an easy, money-saving way to build up stock.
Having the perfect complexion also necessitates having a robust inner health, and our blue immuno-boost drip is the one you need for this.
Now here is the lie: all the components in the drip are water soluble which means it's a very simple job for the kidneys to get rid of them.
Example: Laura Roberts enrolls in the Pfizer DRIP and decides to invest $200 every three months.
The "party girl drip" is made up of C and B as well as minerals selenium, magnesium, zinc and chromium.
Drip research also advances droplet-related applications such as ink-jet printing and depositing DNA on biochips.
Drips are generally a kind of incontinence, a mark of control betrayed by the treacheries of fluid, whether allowed to happen by house painters or by artists.
Whenever fat drips on a flame, heating element, or hot coals, chemicals called PAHs (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) form.
Many corporations raise capital by adopting dividend reinvestment plans (DRIPs), which permit shareholders to reinvest dividends at a discount.
Dividend Reinvestment Plans (DRIPs) are programs that allow individuals to purchase stock directly from the company.
They refer to such imperfect molecules as defective ribosomal products, or DRiPs.
In many other paintings of 1959 (Chicago, 1920 and Winter Nights) and of 1960 (Balaclava and Sculpture's Landscape), Bluhm's slashing, dripping brushstrokes, aggressive power, and sensitive palette became his "signature," one no more mistakable for those of Kline or de Kooning than his drips were for Pollock's.
To avoid cleaning up a mess on the hangar floor or on the flight line, place a drip pan inboard of the front landing gear to catch the continuous drips.