drink down

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drink down

To drink all of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "down." This smoothie is gross—I really can't drink it down.
See also: down, drink
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

drink something down

to drink something; to consume all of something by drinking it. Here, drink this down, and see if it makes you feel better. Drink down this medicine.
See also: down, drink
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
You could suggest he cut his drinking down to three days a week, and then two, and then once a week.
Caroline added: "Just before his heart attack he had cut his drinking down to three nights a week and he was planning on getting healthy.
The boss had me in the office and said, 'I know you can run for fun even after you've had a drink, but I'd sooner you cut the drinking down and you'd be able to run even further and for longer'.
This means that he has blood fever attacks, which necessitate drinking down a quick phial of blood before illness strikes.
The Know Your Limits poll of 1,972 people, carried out by You Gov, showed that heavy drinkers were more likely to put their drinking down to stress than any other reason.
The Hard-castles want to see their offspring happily married, but wayward son Tony (Jonathan Broadbent) would rather be drinking down at his Warwickshire tavern, The Three Pigeons, while daughter Kate (Dorothea Myer-Bennett) is faced with a bashful suitor.
Irving, a property developer and father-of-four, said: "The reason I came up with the idea is that I would go drinking down the Bigg Market and I would see all these youngsters drinking foreign beers like Budweiser and Corona and I thought what a shame it was that no one was drinking anything from Newcastle.
I've cut my drinking down a lot but that week I had a lot of upset and drank throughout the night.
A number of adults questioned in the YouGov poll said they had put excessive drinking down to peer pressure but very few said they expected their friends to keep up with them or forced them to drink more when they did not want to.
The Know Your Limits poll of 1972 people, carried out by YouGov, showed heavy drinkers were more likely to put their drinking down to stress than any other reason.
A local said: "Paul and his mates used to love drinking down here.
Some people may think that they simply can't get their drinking down to these limits.
You see them drinking down by the train line every night.