drinking age


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drinking age

In poker, a slang term for the initial hand of a Two and an Ace, referring to the legal age to purchase alcohol in the US, 21. Also called an Acey Deucey or an A2. I felt pretty good after I was dealt a drinking age, but the rest of the cards gave me nothing to work with.
See also: age, drink
References in periodicals archive ?
It seems that there would be one simple and convincing argument to make for lowering the drinking age. Amethyst Initiative supporters need to show that the prohibition has actually created more drinking among 18- to 20-year-olds than it has prevented.
Efforts in states including Minnesota, Wisconsin and Vermont to relax the drinking age have been rebuffed.
McCardell further contends that the 21-year-old drinking age has not changed drinking habits on college campuses.
Since Congress passed the Uniform Drinking Age Act in 1984, traffic fatalities involving drivers aged 18 to 20 have been cut by 13 percent, according to the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration.
Should we raise the drinking age, lower it or leave it at 18?
During the 1970s and into the early 1980s, many states lowered their legal drinking age from 21 to 18 or 19.
Tom Watson (Lab West Bromwich East) said: "I'm not sure raising the drinking age would help but we could make more use of alcohol control zones, which ban people from drinking outside except in specially licensed areas."
Amy Brook, 17, said: "Making the drinking age higher is just another way to make England more Americanised and it won't stop underage drinking."
The apparent "consensus" is that Alberta's current drinking age is too low and contributes to a raft of problems.
Although many governments have responded with legislative steps to restrict alcohol consumption in young people (e.g., Gonzalez, 1989; Lotterhos et al., 1988), New Zealand recently took the controversial step of lowering the drinking age from 20 to 18.
The Task Force has recommended that states maintain and enforce minimum legal drinking age laws and "zero tolerance" laws for young drivers.
Police discovered what they called a ``big booze party'' being held by the eight, seven of whom were under the legal drinking age of 21.
Such environmental interventions may be national in scope (e.g., uniform drinking age), regional (e.g., state- or provincial-level zero-tolerance or graduated driver licensing laws(1)), local (e.g., local zoning to reduce outlet density), or even at the level of institutions (e.g., policies in bars, stores, schools).
This study uses data from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth to investigate the effect of minimum drinking age laws (MDALs) on youth alcohol consumption.
The rates also dropped when the legal drinking age was raised (MMWR 49[16]:346-49, 2000).