drill in(to) (someone or something)

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drill in

To teach something through repetition. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drill" and "in." When I was a kid, our teachers simply drilled the times tables in. We're going to keep drilling in these formulas until you know them off by heart!
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drill in(to) (someone or something)

1. Literally, to bore into or pierce something. Unfortunately, we need to drill into the ground to try to find the burst pipe.
2. To teach something through repetition. In this usage, a noun or pronoun is used between "drill" and "in." When I was a kid, the times tables were simply drilled into us.
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drill someone in something

to give someone practice in something. Now, I am going to drill you in irregular verbs. The teacher drilled the students in the use of the passive.
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drill in (to something)

to bore into or penetrate something. The worker drilled into the wall in three places. Please don't drill into the wall here, where it will show.
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drill something into someone or something

 and drill something in
Fig. to force knowledge into someone or something Learn this stuff! Drill it into your brain. Drill in this information so you know it by heart!
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drill into

v.
1. To penetrate some surface by boring: The geologist drilled into the Earth's crust.
2. To teach or inculcate something to someone by constant, intense repetition: The teacher drilled the multiplication tables into the bored students. The teacher tried to drill into our heads the capital of every country.
See also: drill
References in periodicals archive ?
This summer, while drilling into an underwater plateau off the northwest coast of Australia, an international scientific team pulled up a rich haul of sediments chronicling the breakup of the supercontinent Pangaea, the waxing and waning of global seas and the evolution of one of the most important marine plants.
Haq of the National Science Foundation, says the success of Leg 122 provides incentive for planning more drilling into the scientifically important continental margins.
But drilling into volcanic rocks younger than a million years old has been very difficult.