drifting


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

drift along

To move along with little effort or direction. We just drifted along on an inflatable raft until we reached the other end of the river. I'm worried because you're just drifting along through high school with no interest in planning your future!
See also: drift

drift apart

1. To move away from something slowly, especially while floating on water. I guess the inner tubes drifted apart because they're now scattered across the pool.
2. To gradually become distant from someone after a period of closeness. Andrea and I never had a big fight or anything; we just drifted apart over the years, and now, I hardly ever see her.
See also: apart, drift

drift away

1. To move away from something slowly, especially while floating on water. I guess the inner tubes all drifted away from each other because they're now scattered across the pool.
2. To gradually become distant from someone after a period of closeness. Andrea and I never had a big fight or anything; we just drifted away from each other over the years, and now, I hardly ever see her.
See also: away, drift

drift back

To move toward someone or something slowly, especially while floating on water. The inner tubes were all scattered across the pool, but now, they're drifting back to the steps.
See also: back, drift

drift in(to) (something)

To move slowly into some thing or place. Whenever they have study hall, the students tend to just drift into the attendance office, as if they have nothing better to do.
See also: drift

drift off

1. To move slowly away from someone or something, especially while propelled by wind or water. I held the feather in my palm until it drifted off into the air.
2. To gradually fall sleep. I really do want to watch this movie with you, but I'm so tired that I keep drifting off.
3. To lose interest and stop paying attention to someone or something. I think you need to add some humor to this speech so that your audience doesn't drift off while you're talking.
4. To slowly leave one place or thing to go to another. We all had a hard time saying good-bye to each other, but eventually, we all drifted off to our cars.
See also: drift, off

drift off to sleep

To gradually fall sleep. I really do want to watch this movie with you, but I'm so tired that I keep drifting off to sleep.
See also: drift, off, sleep

drift out

To slowly leave one place or thing. Because it was a rainy Monday morning, the students just drifted out of the room after the bell rang.
See also: drift, out

drift with (something)

1. Literally, to move slowly while propelled by something (such as wind or water). It's more relaxing to just let the boat drift with the waves.
2. To allow oneself to be pulled along with others' decisions or feelings. When will you stop being such a follower, drifting with all of your friends' stupid ideas? That senator always drifts with his party, so I doubt he'll oppose them in this vote.
See also: drift

drift with the tide

To passively agree with others. He always just drifts with the tide and does whatever dumb thing his friends are doing, no questions asked. That senator always drifts with the tide, so I doubt he'll oppose his party in this vote.
See also: drift, tide

drift along

to float along; to be carried along on no particular course. The boat just drifted along lazily with the current. The project drifted along until we received the leadership we needed.
See also: drift

drift apart

 (from each other )
1. . Lit. [for floating things] to separate as they drift. The boats drifted apart from one another. The boats drifted apart in the waves.
2. Fig. [for people] to lead their lives without contact with each other having been together or friendly. He drifted apart from his friends. As the years went by, they drifted apart.
See also: apart, drift

drift away

(from someone ) Fig. [for someone] to begin to be less of a friend and more like a stranger. (See also drift away (from someone or something).) He began drifting away from me a few months ago, andlhaven'tseenhim at all in the last three weeks.
See also: away, drift

drift away

(from someone or something ) [for floating people, animals, or things] to move away from a particular person or thing, on the surface of water. (See also .) We watched the boat drift away from us. He was drifting away on the ice block and there was nothing we could do.
See also: away, drift

drift back (to someone or something)

to move back to someone or something slowly, on the surface of water. The canoe drifted back to shore. My little boat finally drifted back to me.
See also: back, drift

drift back (to someone or something)

to move back to someone or something slowly, on the surface of water. The canoe drifted back to shore. My little boat finally drifted back to me.
See also: back, drift

drift off

to move slowly away. The boat slowly drifted off and was gone. The clouds drifted off and the sun came out.
See also: drift, off

drift off to sleep

Fig. to fall asleep gradually. At last, he drifted off to sleep. During that boring lecture, I drifted off to sleep a number of times.
See also: drift, off, sleep

drift out

to move out of a place slowly. After there was no more food, the people drifted out, one by one. The boat drifted out and almost got away.
See also: drift, out

drift off

v.
1. To move away slowly, especially while being carried by currents of air or water: The stick drifted off with the river current. The child let go of the balloon and it drifted off toward the horizon.
2. To walk slowly toward some other place or area: As they left the cafeteria, the students started drifting off toward the gym.
3. To fall asleep gradually: I drifted off while watching television. I was so tired that I drifted off.
4. To stop listening or paying attention to someone or something: The professor noted that most of the students had drifted off during the lecture.
See also: drift, off
References in periodicals archive ?
The drifting fever was evolved back in 2009, when the first regional drifting competition was launched.
According to Hisham Sd, a professional racer and drifter, drivers are also judged on the looks of the car, the sound and the smoke, general drifting skills, and the reaction of the crowd.
Despite being widely regarded as one of the best drifting tracks in Europe due its the fast flowing lines with a technical mid-section, drifting has not taken place there since 2008 due to noise concerns.
Then we heard about this D1 New Zealand Drifting Championship, so my girlfriend and I went along and watched.
We believe there is a lot of talent in the region for Drifting and we aim to help people enjoy it, we already have developed a core EMSF Drift team who have been trained in Drifting and we are really excited about this event, commented Ahmed Sharif", EMSF Director.
Our objectives were to determine if hikers caused an increase in drifting of aquatic invertebrates in areas of the North Fork of the Virgin River that had concentrated use and to examine longer-term effects of disturbance by hikers on standing stocks of benthic invertebrates.
The Drifting steering wheel comes in two versions - racing and tuning - and features a 90mm dish developed at the request of drifting drivers for maximum oversteer control.
Drifting, a craze that emanated from Japan, involves high-powered rear-wheel-drive cars being driven in a sustained sideways fashion.
Studying snow can lead to useful things, such as methods for shielding highways from drifting snow and for easing droughts.
They graze on drifting plants and algae known as phytoplankton that bask in sunlight near the ocean surface, or underwater within sunlight's reach.
The rules do not prohibit a player from drifting and then turning to the left in fair territory after passing first base, as long he makes no attempt to advance to second.
The data enabled researchers to precisely pin the source of most of the events to a large, drifting iceberg dubbed B-15B.
Decter, in a brief curatorial statement, said that the show "employ[ed] the idea of drifting to suggest the increasingly porous quality of today's cultural life.