draw blood

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draw blood

1. To take blood from one, as with a needle in a medical setting. The doctor wants to draw blood to see what my cholesterol levels are. We just need to draw some blood before the surgery.
2. To injure one or oneself to the point of bleeding. That bit of tissue is on my face because I drew blood while shaving this morning. I can't believe that skinny little kid drew blood when he punched the bully in the nose!
3. By extension, to cause one to become very angry or emotional. I'm usually a calm person, but Addison always manages to say something that draws blood.
See also: blood, draw

draw blood

 
1. Lit. to hit or bite (a person or an animal) and make a wound that bleeds. The dog chased me and bit me hard, but it didn't draw blood. The boxer landed just one punch and drew blood immediately.
2. Fig. to anger or insult a person. Sally screamed out a terrible insult at Tom. Judging by the look on his face, she really drew blood. Tom started yelling and cursing, trying to insult Sally. He wouldn't be satisfied until he had drawn blood, too.
See also: blood, draw

draw blood

Injure someone physically or emotionally. For example, The bullet skimmed his shoulder and barely drew any blood, or That reviewer really knows how to draw blood. This term alludes to drawing blood for diagnostic purposes.
See also: blood, draw
References in periodicals archive ?
In another part of the experiment, the researchers drew blood from vaccinated mice and exposed it to the bacterium Bacillus licheniformis as a stand-in for the more dangerous Bacillus anthracis, which causes anthrax.
Like the hard-core partisans they are, the Democrats drew blood right back - and they haven't stopped.
To see whether it's possible to predict the likelihood of side effects for an individual, Crompton and his colleagues drew blood from nearly 400 people who had been diagnosed with various forms of cancer and who were about to begin long-term radiation therapy.
On the first and last day of treatment, Percival drew blood from the volunteers and separated out the neutrophils, a type of white blood cell.
He had a bandage on his right arm, the result of a cut on his arm that drew blood and forced a second-half jersey exchange.
The researchers drew blood and zeroed in on a gene that, when mutated in any of several ways, produces the symptoms of this disease.