References in classic literature ?
Early in my childhood I learned that nuts came from the grocer, berries from the fruit man; but before ever that knowledge was mine, in my dreams I picked nuts from trees, or gathered them and ate them from the ground underneath trees, and in the same way I ate berries from vines and bushes.
I had never seen blueberries before, and yet, at the sight of them, there leaped up in my mind memories of dreams wherein I had wandered through swampy land eating my fill of them.
And on my inner vision flashed the memories of my dreams,--the midday sun shining on tall grass, the wild bull grazing quietly, the sudden parting of the grass before the swift rush of the tawny one, his leap to the bull's back, the crashing and the bellowing, and the crunch crunch of bones; or again, the cool quiet of the water-hole, the wild horse up to his knees and drinking softly, and then the tawny one--always the tawny one
First hear the king's dream, O Prince," I said; "then, if thou wilt, kill me, and die.
The Prince Umhlangana wore it--in the dream of Chaka--O Dingaan, shoot of a royal stock
The Prince Dingaan held it--in the dream of Chaka--O Umhlangana, sprung from the root of kings
The staircase was as wooden and solid as need be, and Affery went straight down it without any of those deviations peculiar to dreams.
The call of the brook came up through the woods from the valley of birches with all its old allurement; the mellow air was full of the purr of the sea; beyond were fields rimmed by fences bleached silvery gray in the suns of many summers, and long hills scarfed with the shadows of autumnal clouds; with the blowing of the west wind old dreams returned.
I think," said Anne softly, "that `the land where dreams come true' is in the blue haze yonder, over that little valley.
Jasper did not find it hard to talk to her now; it seemed as if he were talking to his dream Alice, and it came strangely natural to him.
She could not move or speak; as one in a dream she stood and listened to the shy man's reverie, guiltless of any thought of eavesdropping.
All right," I said resignedly, "let the dream go on; I'm in no hurry.
Why, the dream that I am in Arthur's court -- a person who never existed; and that I am talking to you, who are nothing but a work of the imagination.
Seeing this, and dreading the effect of any violent agitation, I hastened to suggest that we should say no more, for that day, on the subject of her dream.
My dream has left one horrible remembrance on my mind.