draw back


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draw back

1. To move backwards, away from someone or something. The baby drew back when the cat started meowing at her. As soon as I heard the buzzing bees, I drew back from the flowers.
2. To abandon a plan or course of action. I had hoped to play baseball again this year, but I had to draw back after I broke my foot in the first game of the season.
3. To retreat or withdraw. The troops were so outnumbered that they were forced to draw back.
See also: back, draw

draw back

1. Retreat, as in The heckler drew back into the crowd to avoid being identified. [c. 1300]
2. Withdraw from an undertaking, as in I was too deeply committed to draw back now. [Mid-1800s]
See also: back, draw

draw back

v.
1. To retreat: The soldiers drew back after a night of intense fighting. When the general gave the order, the regiment drew back.
2. To recoil from someone or something: The dog drew back when my friend moved to pet it. He reached out to me, but I drew back.
3. To decide not to follow a planned course of action: The politician drew back from seeking candidacy this year.
See also: back, draw
References in periodicals archive ?
As he crossed the creek, I was able to draw back and prepare for the approaching buck.
Red learnt how to put his mouth around the bolt on his door, lift it, draw back the lock and then free the other dogs for midnight feasts.
And the other draw back is that the matches will be screened at 1am unless the kick-off times can be altered for the benefit of European TV.
Their statement says now is the time to draw back from the brink.
MARK TWAIN, in a letter to Carl Thalbitzer, who had asked Twain to write about "the advantages and draw backs of civilization," in Harper's (Dec.