drank


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drink with the flies

To drink alone. Primarily heard in Australia. Come on, meet up with me at the bar! As it is, I'm just drinking with the flies, and it's depressing. Don't leave me here to drink with the flies—stay a little longer!
See also: drink, flies

(do something) to excess

To do or indulge in something too much. I started to lose weight once I stopped regularly eating to excess. I'll go to the pub with you guys, but I'm not drinking to excess tonight—I have to be up early tomorrow.
See also: excess

drink down

To drink all of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "down." This smoothie is gross—I really can't drink it down.
See also: down, drink

drink in

To absorb and enjoy something thoroughly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "in." Let's stop for a moment and drink in this fresh mountain air. I'm glad I was able to drink in the excitement and joy of our wedding day before it was all over.
See also: drink

drink like a fish

To frequently drink a lot of alcohol. I'm not surprised to hear that Karl got drunk again last night—that guy drinks like a fish!
See also: drink, fish, like

drink to excess

To drink alcohol to the point of intoxication. This is an important event for me, honey, so please don't drink to excess and make a fool of yourself.
See also: drink, excess

drink (oneself) silly

To drink alcohol to a point of extreme intoxication. Of course you don't remember last night at the bar—you drank yourself silly!
See also: drink, silly

drink (oneself) to sleep

To drink alcohol until one loses consciousness or is unable to stay awake any longer. You have to drink yourself to sleep each night? You might have a drinking problem, Jerry. Dad drank himself to sleep in his armchair again.
See also: drink, sleep

drink like a fish

Fig. to drink alcohol excessively; to be in the habit of drinking alcohol excessively. Jeff really drank like a fish at the party on Saturday. I worry about Nancy; she drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink something down

to drink something; to consume all of something by drinking it. Here, drink this down, and see if it makes you feel better. Drink down this medicine.
See also: down, drink

drink something in

Fig. to absorb something; to take in information, sights, a story, etc. Terry and Amy drove up to the top of the hill to drink the sights in. They drank in the beautiful view.
See also: drink

drink to excess

Euph. to drink too much alcohol; to drink alcohol continually. Mr. Franklin drinks to excess. Some people drink to excess only at parties.
See also: drink, excess

drink like a fish

Consume large amounts of alcoholic beverages, as in He always drinks like a fish at holiday dinners. The expression, first recorded in the mid-1600s, alludes to the way fish obtain oxygen, which causes them to be open-mouthed and appear to be constantly drinking.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

INFORMAL
If someone drinks like a fish, they regularly drink a lot of alcohol. When I was younger I could drink like a fish and eat like a pig. The father was not too bad but the mother drank like a fish. Note: People used to believe that fish drank constantly because they breathe through open mouths.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

drink excessive amounts of alcohol, especially habitually.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink with the flies

drink alone. Australian & New Zealand informal
1963 D. Whitington Mile Pegs ‘Have a drink?’ the larrikin invited. ‘Or do you prefer drinking with the flies?’
See also: drink, flies

drink like a ˈfish

(informal) regularly drink too much alcohol: Her husband drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink in

v.
To take something in eagerly through the senses or the mind: The campers drank in the view of the sunset over the mountain lake. The shoreline was so beautiful that I stopped for a while to drink it in.
See also: drink
References in periodicals archive ?
Even more remarkable, reporters covering Joe McCarthy knew he drank heavily but didn't report it until after his censure.
those who drank between one a month and six a week, and those who chose regular soft drinks were not more likely to suffer vascular events.
her sources' term?), especially during the 1920's, when workers deprived of taverns drank in clusters outside bottle shops.
The habit of elite women to gossip over tea was seen as generally harmless, but working-class women who drank tea came in for harsher criticism, as they were seen to be relaxing rather than working, and spending scarce family resources on an unnecessary luxury.
During the next month, each person drank four 8-ounce cups of either tea or water daily.
But active girls who drank colas were five times more likely to have broken a bone than active girls who drank no cola.
Drunken men, and particularly those who drank habitually, were exceptions to the rule that a man's business was inviolable.
I drank wine all the time when I was pregnant." [16] But had she in fact put her children at risk or was FAS found only in the offspring of severely alcoholic women?
The Harvard Nurses' Health Study, the major study of the connection between drinking and mortality among women, found that about three-quarters of all subjects had at least one such risk factor and were likely to live longer if they drank moderately.
Americans drank twice as many soft drinks in 1997 as they did in 1973 and 43 percent more than in 1985.
Before treatment, volunteers, on average, drank on 25 out of 30 days, a number that fell to 6 days of drinking per month by the end of the follow-up.
After dealing with stereotypes in which he reminds his readers that pre-Revolutionary era Indians "never drank that much" (p.
And birth defects were reported in the children of three women who drank 8 to 25 cups of coffee a day.(3) In 1980, based largely on the animal evidence, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) advised pregnant women to "avoid caffeine-containing foods and drugs, if possible, or consume them only sparingly."
Legislators drank while in session; communion wine was part of Protestant services; the tavern was a family-oriented gathering place; and tavern keepers were highly respected members of the community.
The researchers asked participants about their drinking habits, including how often they drank, the type of alcohol consumed, and how much they drank.