drank


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drink with the flies

To drink alone. Primarily heard in Australia. Come on, meet up with me at the bar! As it is, I'm just drinking with the flies, and it's depressing. Don't leave me here to drink with the flies—stay a little longer!
See also: drink, flies

(do something) to excess

To do or indulge in something too much. I started to lose weight once I stopped regularly eating to excess. I'll go to the pub with you guys, but I'm not drinking to excess tonight—I have to be up early tomorrow.
See also: excess

drink down

To drink all of something. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "down." This smoothie is gross—I really can't drink it down.
See also: down, drink

drink in

To absorb and enjoy something thoroughly. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drink" and "in." Let's stop for a moment and drink in this fresh mountain air. I'm glad I was able to drink in the excitement and joy of our wedding day before it was all over.
See also: drink

drink like a fish

To frequently drink a lot of alcohol. I'm not surprised to hear that Karl got drunk again last night—that guy drinks like a fish!
See also: drink, fish, like

drink to excess

To drink alcohol to the point of intoxication. This is an important event for me, honey, so please don't drink to excess and make a fool of yourself.
See also: drink, excess

drink like a fish

Fig. to drink alcohol excessively; to be in the habit of drinking alcohol excessively. Jeff really drank like a fish at the party on Saturday. I worry about Nancy; she drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink something down

to drink something; to consume all of something by drinking it. Here, drink this down, and see if it makes you feel better. Drink down this medicine.
See also: down, drink

drink something in

Fig. to absorb something; to take in information, sights, a story, etc. Terry and Amy drove up to the top of the hill to drink the sights in. They drank in the beautiful view.
See also: drink

drink to excess

Euph. to drink too much alcohol; to drink alcohol continually. Mr. Franklin drinks to excess. Some people drink to excess only at parties.
See also: drink, excess

drink like a fish

Consume large amounts of alcoholic beverages, as in He always drinks like a fish at holiday dinners. The expression, first recorded in the mid-1600s, alludes to the way fish obtain oxygen, which causes them to be open-mouthed and appear to be constantly drinking.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

INFORMAL
If someone drinks like a fish, they regularly drink a lot of alcohol. When I was younger I could drink like a fish and eat like a pig. The father was not too bad but the mother drank like a fish. Note: People used to believe that fish drank constantly because they breathe through open mouths.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink like a fish

drink excessive amounts of alcohol, especially habitually.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink with the flies

drink alone. Australian & New Zealand informal
1963 D. Whitington Mile Pegs ‘Have a drink?’ the larrikin invited. ‘Or do you prefer drinking with the flies?’
See also: drink, flies

drink like a ˈfish

(informal) regularly drink too much alcohol: Her husband drinks like a fish.
See also: drink, fish, like

drink in

v.
To take something in eagerly through the senses or the mind: The campers drank in the view of the sunset over the mountain lake. The shoreline was so beautiful that I stopped for a while to drink it in.
See also: drink
References in periodicals archive ?
The proportion was significantly higher among women who drank heavily before pregnancy than among women who did not drink during this period (12% vs.
especially during the 1920's, when workers deprived of taverns drank in clusters outside bottle shops.
Even more remarkable, reporters covering Joe McCarthy knew he drank heavily but didn't report it until after his censure.
It did not matter what kind of alcohol the men drank, or whether it was consumed with meals.
But in the new 13-year study, both young and old adults who regularly drank outperformed abstainers of the same age.
Drunken men, and particularly those who drank habitually, were exceptions to the rule that a man's business was inviolable.
35] By enlarging the definition of the population at risk from the offspring of chronic alcoholic women who drank heavily in pregnancy to the offspring of any woman who might have taken a drink at any time following conception, public health activists created a mandate to warn.
While other staffers moaned and groaned (and gave it a thumbs down; it was terrible, some said), I drank a few glasses - it's chocolate, after all.
The percentages of students who drank shots, played drinking games, skipped a meal to "save" calories for alcohol and "pre-partied" before going out for the evening showed significant decreases.
Moreover, the average number of drinks they consumed each time they drank dropped from 15 to three.
He then returned to the bar and drank two rum and Cokes.
The researchers asked participants about their drinking habits, including how often they drank, the type of alcohol consumed, and how much they drank.
Behind the velvet ropes at South Beach's hottest spot Honey, an eclectic crowd of energetic partygoers mixed, mingled and drank Yohimbe Energy Drink.
So the NIAAA used a different standard of success: It emphasized that the subjects entered treatment drinking, on average, 25 days per month and 15 drinks per occasion; after treatment they drank, on average, five to six days a month and three drinks per occasion.