drag

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Related to dragging: dragging feet, dragging out
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a drag

A person, thing, or task that is tedious or boring. I don't know who invited this guy to the party. He is a such a drag! I know cleaning out the garage is a drag, but it has to be done.
See also: drag

drag

1. noun A person, thing, or task that is tedious or boring. In this usage, the term is almost always used singularly and preceded by "a." I don't know who invited this guy to the party. He is a such a drag! I know cleaning out the garage is a drag, but it has to be done.
2. noun A street, typically the most prominent street in a small town, often one where businesses, shops, restaurants, etc. are located. We're going to walk down to the main drag and do some shopping for a while. The main drag where I grew up had one traffic light, one gas station, and one diner.
3. noun An instance of inhaling smoke from a cigarette or something else being smoked. Every time you take a drag, you're inhaling dozens of different toxic chemicals.
4. noun The clothing or ensemble worn by one dressing as a member of a different gender, especially in an exaggerated way as part of a performance (e.g. that of a drag queen). I was a little nervous the first time I performed in drag, but I got a great response from the crowd.
5. noun, dated slang The person accompanying one on a date, typically a girl or woman. I heard you're Johnny's drag for the prom.
6. noun, dated slang A dance. I heard you're Johnny's date to the drag tonight.
7. verb To inhale smoke from a cigarette or something else being smoked. Every time you drag on a cigarette, you're inhaling dozens of different toxic chemicals.
8. verb, slang To mock, ridicule, or mistreat. He's getting dragged pretty hard on Twitter today for what he said during that interview.

dragged

Mocked, ridiculed, or mistreated by someone or something. Ugh, dragged by my tarot cards once again—looks like the universe doesn't have anything good in store for me! Dude, if you post that picture on Twitter, you're definitely going to get dragged.
See also: drag
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

(a) drag

(on someone ) a burden (to someone). I wish you wouldn 't be such a drag on your friends. I don't want to be a drag on the department.

drag

someone or something on(to) something and drag someone or something on*to pull or lead someone or something to a particular place, such as a stage, platform, dance floor, etc. The master of ceremonies dragged her onto the stage for another bow. Then he dragged on the next performer.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

a drag

A tedious experience, a bore, as in After several thousand times, signing your autograph can be a drag. This seemingly modern term was army slang during the Civil War. The allusion probably is to drag as something that impedes progress. [Colloquial; mid-1800s]
See also: drag
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

a drag

verb
See also: drag

a drag

verb
See also: drag

drag

1. n. something dull and boring. What a drag. Let’s go someplace interesting.
2. n. an annoying person; a burdensome person. (see also schlep.) Gert could sure be a drag when she wanted.
3. n. a (female) date. You got a drag for the dance yet?
4. n. a puff of a cigarette. One more drag and he coughed for a while and stubbed out the fag.
5. tv. to pull or puff on a cigarette. She dragged a couple and sat in the funk for a while.
6. tv. to race a car against someone; to race someone in a car. I’m planning to drag you at the fairgrounds next Saturday. Better be there.

dragged

mod. anxious or frightened after smoking marijuana. (Drugs.) The kid was dragged. You could tell he didn’t have much experience with the real world.
See also: drag
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

drag (one's)

feet/heels
To act or work with intentional slowness; delay.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Frame dragging is expected to make each gyroscope's spin axis drift just 42 milliarc-seconds per year in the direction of Earth's rotation.
Besides the subtle drift, or precession, due to frame dragging, the mission will also be looking for another, more readily detectable effect predicted by the general theory of relativity.
IT'S ALL RELATIVE Although geodetic precession seems huge compared with frame dragging, both effects are minuscule.
At least for frame dragging, GP-B's expected accuracy is not really a coup, says Nordtvedt.
It's the gravitomagnetic field that causes frame dragging, Nordtvedt says.
If the disk happens to orbit at an angle to the plane in which the neutron star spins, the dragging of space-time will cause the disk to wobble like a top, adds Frederick K.
Lamb maintains that the separation in frequency between each of the new sidebands and its neighboring QPO is too great for it to represent frame dragging. Others are more sanguine about the new result.
The researchers urged hunters with heart disease to avoid dragging a deer, the hunting activity that makes the most sustained demand on the heart.
Branch dragging was performed mainly by adult males, and occasionally by adult females and adolescent males.
Branch dragging is likely to take place during the chimps' daily treks through the forest, Ingmanson says.
"Very specific information is communicated through branch dragging concerning intention and direction of movement," Ingmanson notes.