drag (something) in(to) (something)

drag (something) in(to) (something)

To bring something unwarranted into a particular situation, often in an aggressive manner. When we argue, he drags every one of my past misdeeds into the conversation—it's so frustrating!
See also: drag

drag in

1. To move or haul someone or something in(to something or some place) with great effort. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drag" and "in." The cat keeps dragging in dead birds and mice. His leg was broken, so we had to drag him in out of the storm.
2. To cause someone or something to trail along some surface. A noun or pronoun is used between "drag" and "in." The horse dragged me in the road for nearly 10 minutes before my foot finally came loose. Please don't drag your coat in the dirt like that!
3. To move some element of a graphical display on the screen of a computer, smartphone, or tablet in a particular direction, position, or location within the screen or device. A noun or pronoun is used between "drag" and "in." Just click and hold the picture, then drag it in the folder where you want it stored. I think there's a bug in this app, because I can't drag the icon in the right position anymore.
4. To force, impel, involve, or convince someone to go or come into somewhere undesirable. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drag" and "in." I really didn't want to be here today, but my husband dragged me in. I always have to drag in the kids for supper during the summer.
5. To involve or bring up someone or something in a conversation, especially when doing so is unwarranted or uncalled for. A noun or pronoun can be used between "drag" and "in." Please don't drag the kids in like that—they've got nothing to do with this! He's always dragging in that incident from two years ago to undermine my ability to make decisions.
See also: drag
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

drag in

Introduce unnecessarily or forcefully. For example, The defense tried to drag in every scrap of evidence, relevant or not. [Mid-1800s] Also see look like something the cat dragged in.
See also: drag
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
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