down to somebody/something

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down to (someone or something)

Including everyone or everything in a group or list. She's obsessing about every aspect of wedding planning, down to the shade of the ink on the invitations.
See also: down

down to somebody/something

even including the last item of a whole list of people or things: Everybody was affected by the economic crisis, from the president down to the poorest citizen.She’s thought of everything down to the tiniest details!
See also: down, somebody, something
References in periodicals archive ?
I know time is running out and it is getting down to the wire, so now it is time for me to buckle down and get down to brass tacks.
5 : to or toward the south <We're heading down to Florida.
Sometimes it takes more than one Stand Down to get them off the street,'' Hope said.
NOT LETTING THE CLOCK GO DOWN TO :03 BEFORE AN END-OF-HALF FIELD GOAL ATTEMPT.
It's not as if Joe Terrorist can wander down to the local range and fire off a couple of practice shots.
Murray climbs down to help stop the bleeding, and the game comes to an end on a rather abrupt and sentimental note.
What it all boils down to, however, is an assault on the basic American metropolitan paradigm.
5x debt-to-rolling latest 12-month (LTM) EBITDA, stepping down to 4.
Regardless of the approach you choose, success or failure may well come down to how well your defense executes in third-and-long situations.
To drive home the point, officers ticketed any illegal modifications to cars, down to the lack of a front license plate or illegally colored headlights.
U-CLOSE enables Zero Down to create images of files from the point of origination, which streamlines the entire process and increases efficiency so that loans can be closed more quickly.
It is very important to break down to block, as the DB will run right by the receiver if the receiver is not in a good athletic position.
When asked directly if they had ever shared a password, all respondents reflected an overall dramatic swing of the pendulum, with six percent more saying they have never shared a password, up to 65 percent; and six percent fewer saying they have, down to 35 percent.