dove

(redirected from dovishness)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Legal, Encyclopedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

hawks and doves

Respectively, those who favor or support aggressive military action, especially regarding foreign policy, versus those who are inclined to more peaceful, diplomatic solutions. After the terrorist attacks, the hawks in Congress demanded a unilateral attack on the foreign nation, while the doves among them maintained that diplomatic sanctions would be effective for the time being.
See also: and, dove, hawk

crash dive

1. noun A sudden descent, typically in an emergency situation. The phrase is usually applied to submarines and airplanes. Engine two is out, prepare for a crash dive!
2. verb To make such a descent. My brain could barely comprehend that the our lives were in danger before the plane started to crash dive.
See also: crash, dive

dive in with both feet

To begin or undertake something quickly, enthusiastically, and without trepidation. I know you're nervous about starting school, but you just need to dive in with both feet and do your best!
See also: both, dive, feet

dive into (something)

1. Literally, to jump or leap into something, often a pool. I was so hot after my run that I dove into the pool as soon as I got home.
2. To start a task enthusiastically, perhaps without much forethought. Because we just dove into fixing up our house, every room is under construction at the same time.
3. To begin eating something enthusiastically. Each kid dove into his slice of cake as soon as it was set before him.
See also: dive

dive off

Literally, to jump or leap off of something, often headfirst. After debating it for several summers, Anna finally dove off the high dive at the community pool today.
See also: dive, off

dive in with both feet

 and jump in with both feet
Fig. to become completely involved with something quickly, especially something new. I had never done anything like this before, but I just jumped in with both feet and learned it in no time.
See also: both, dive, feet

dive off

((of) something ) to jump off something headfirst. (Of is usually retained before pronouns.) Rachel dived off of the rock into the river. She dived off the high diving board.
See also: dive, off

dove

(dəv)
n. someone who supports a peace-seeking U.S. defense policy. (Compare this with hawk.) The doves want to sell the tanks and distribute the money to the poor.
References in periodicals archive ?
Central Banks dovishness puts a floor to risky assets and a cap to the euro
This is not a prescription for isolationism, or even unalloyed dovishness. It is more a matter of recognizing that conceivable uses of military force run the gamut from vital interests to aspects of the liberal empire that are far less than vital.
An example of dovishness in fully informed foreign policy preferences comes from another question from the 1988 NES: "Do you favor or oppose using American military forces in the Middle East to protect oil shipments?" While 64% of actual responses favored military deployment, support dropped to 58% of fully informed responses.
The question is, are lawmakers resorting to new conceptions of hawkishness and dovishness, or are they using their arguments to mask a return to partisan struggles over military intervention?
Theirs is a frivolous kind of moderation; dovishness as chic.
But the Pentagon dovishness on Lebanon was finally outweighed by the hwkishness of the NSC, which, under Ronald Reagan, had taken on a crazy cowboy quality.
Yet crosswinds from the relative dovishness from the ECB and Fed yesterday have helped backstop the bulls, even while cautious ahead of bank earnings on Friday.
Building up too much on one piece of information may be misleading, and that's why investors need to be cautious, especially given that the Fed's dovishness and a positive outcome to U.S.-China trade talks have already been priced in equity markets.
Markets have shrugged that off as largely symptomatic of problems confined to the energy sector, supported by aggressive interventions by global central banks and dovishness at the Fed.
2014 should see more of the same as 2013: a speed-up in growth, a stronger G7 recovery and continued dovishness from the central banks.
Traders will scour the statement for any sign of greater dovishness among the rate-setting committee members that could be interpreted as raising the chances for the Fed to use additional policy tools to boost growth.
The Washington Post's Jennifer Rubin, quick to spy "unseriousness" in the form of incipient dovishness upon the part of Republican aspirants--like such notorious McGovernites as Mitch Daniels and Haley Barbour--absolved Romney of any foreign-policy heterodoxy.
Like Stevenson during the Cuban missile crisis, Powell was seen as the house dove, and because of his perceived dovishness, the words he delivered carried substantial weight.
The relationship between Soviet dovishness and American hawkishness is, in other words, the exact opposite of what it boastfully claimed.
The markets may be overly optimistic on the extent of the FOMC's dovishness, and there could be a knee jerk selloff in bonds and stocks if the Fed maintains at least one tightening in its outlook.