doughboys


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doughboys

n. the female breasts. What a nice pair of doughboys!
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
11, three young men stood in the cold at the foot of Naperville's Doughboy sculpture and played "When the Battle's O'er" on their bagpipes.
More than 76,000 statues depicting 'Tommies' and 'Doughboys' have already been sold to be displayed during the Armistice commemorations, like this one at the White Cliffs of Dover and at St Augustine's Church, Swindon, pictured left
Caption: The Sanilac County World War I "American Doughboy" memorial.
What Gutierrez reveals is a generational portrait of men who believed strongly in the old abstractions lamented by Hemingway and his cohort: Namely, doughboys emerged from a clearly defined culture of heroic masculinity and fought out of a sense of duty and patriotism.
This volume draws on the words that American soldiers, or "doughboys," fighting in the American Expeditionary Force on the Western Front in World War I read and wrote during and after their experiences, such as military documents, memoirs, letters, and articles from the soldiers' newspaper The Stars and Stripes, to illustrate their experiences in training, in the American Expeditionary Force, the organizations providing support for them, the fighting, and returning home.
There simply weren't enough ships to get the Doughboys across the Atlantic Ocean and now thousands of Doughboys were being crowded into transit camps near the ports.
Empey deserves to be remembered, especially on this Veterans Day - a hundred years after he blazed a trail for the thousands of doughboys who would follow.
Although outside of the scope of the book, a more extensive description of the campaigns and engagements in which the Doughboys fought would have provided better context for the reader.
I'm curious about the word doughboy, which is used in reference to World War I infantrymen.
"The Last of the Doughboys is memorable mostly because of the memorable doughboys it tracks down.
World War I memorials of Doughboys, which refer to the nickname given to WWI soldiers, attracted Professor Wingate's interest because they were mostly the product of grassroots efforts.
This history of the American Doughboys, who served in the first American occupation of Germany during WWI, is illustrated throughout with b&w historical photos and color photos of uniforms, medals, and other memorabilia.
This attitude is a mainstay of every war, but it's more pronounced when there's substantial public doubt about the war effort, as with the World War I-era belief that Greenwich Village reds were hurting our doughboys by handing out peacemongering fliers.
Q DOES anyone know why, during the Second World War, American soldiers were known as doughboys?