doughboys


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doughboys

n. the female breasts. What a nice pair of doughboys!
References in periodicals archive ?
Charles History Museum will present "American Doughboys in World War I" from 7 to 8 p.
If doughboys were not disillusioned, then what were they?
Thomas Stewart of Eugene, a former trustee of the University of Oregon Foundation, is the grandson of a World War I doughboy who served in France and Belgium in 1917-18.
company, announced today that retired Command Sergeant Major Jeffrey Mellinger, Bell Helicopter s aircraft design liaison, received the2015 Doughboy Award.
Doughboys on the Great War is a gripping and engaging view into the feelings and perspectives of the average soldier before, during, and immediately after World War I.
I'm curious about the word doughboy, which is used in reference to World War I infantrymen.
The Last of the Doughboys is memorable mostly because of the memorable doughboys it tracks down.
Redressing the neglect of World War I memorials in art history scholarship and memory studies, Sculpting Doughboys considers the hundreds of sculptures of American soldiers that dominated the nation's sculptural commemorative landscape after World War I.
Doughboys, the Great War, and the Remaking of America.
Among countless nominees you probably won't see on TV are, for example, the jazz solo bunch (Chick Corea, Joey DeFrancesco, Keith Jarrett, Pat Martino, Mike Melvoin), the bluegrass gospel album contingent (Blue Highway, Crabb Family, Gaither Vocal Band, Engelbert Humperdinck, Blackwood Brothers Quartet, the Jordanaires & the Light Crust Doughboys, Randy Travis) or those up for choral performance (Dale Warland, Paul Hillier, Edward Higginbottom, Paavo Jarvi, Laurence Equilbey).
Consequently, even the most recent popular histories tend to dwell on the undeniable heroism of America's doughboys at Cantigny and Belleau Wood, rather than the tactical mistakes and the rather shocking level of casualties.
During World War I, when I was a kid of six and seven, I grew radishes in my backyard "victory garden," Mom knitted wool socks for the doughboys, and Dad bought Liberty bonds.
In the early 20th century, the terms of the libidinal economies were shifting everywhere, quickened by the war: the black jazzmen, the doughboys, the Latin lovers, and the advertisers all put forward markedly new strains of desire on both sides of the Atlantic.
If you recall those archival photos of World War I doughboys home on leave, you may remember that, from the knees down, their legs appeared to be encased in strips of cloth wound spirally around from ankle to knee.