doom and gloom

(redirected from doom-and-gloom)
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doom and gloom

(A situation) characterized by negativity or futility. The situation isn't all doom and gloom—there are still plenty of good schools that did accept you!
See also: and, doom, gloom
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

doom and gloom

a general feeling of pessimism or despondency.
This expression, sometimes found as gloom and doom , was particularly pertinent to fears about a nuclear holocaust during the cold war period of the 1950s and 1960s. It became a catchphrase in the 1968 film Finian's Rainbow.
See also: and, doom, gloom
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

ˌdoom and ˈgloom

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ˌgloom and ˈdoom

a general feeling of having lost all hope and of pessimism (= expecting things to go badly): Despite the obvious setbacks, it’s not all doom and gloom for the England team.
See also: and, doom, gloom
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

gloom and doom

Utter pessimism, expecting the worst. This rhyming phrase, which is sometimes reversed to doom and gloom, dates from the mid-1900s but became widely used only from the 1980s on. Nigel Rees cites an early use in the musical comedy Finian’s Rainbow (1947), in which a pessimistic leprechaun sings, “I told you that gold could only bring you doom and gloom, gloom and doom.” More recently, Clive Cussler wrote, “Pitt stared at Gunn, mildly surprised that the second-in-command was prey to his own thoughts of doom and gloom” (Sahara, 1992).
See also: and, doom, gloom
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, I have never been able to come up with a suitable response to the doom-and-gloom apocalyptic message.
As I think about all of the doom-and-gloom environmental preaching and the paralysis it spawns, last night's rainbow becomes a stark proclamation of the Word of God.
But what seems to have been missed in all the doom-and-gloom headlines, according to Steven Chen, PharmD, an assistant professor of clinical pharmacy at the University of Southern California School of Pharmacy in Los Angeles, is the fact that all drugs have potential risks, requiring careful monitoring.
Certainly, there are challenges ahead--namely keeping threats like Pierce's disease at bay and keeping up with global competition--but it sure beats the doom-and-gloom tone of the grape-glut years.