do (one's) homework

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do (one's) homework

1. Literally, to complete the school work that has been assigned by a teacher to be done at home. You can't watch any more television until you do your homework!
2. To be thoroughly prepared and informed about something or something, especially in advance of some process, action, or decision. Be sure you do your homework before heading into that meeting; there's a lot at stake, and no one's going to like it if you aren't up to speed. I always do my homework before I make big purchases.
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do your homework

If you do your homework, you prepare for something, especially by finding out information about it. Before you buy any shares, do your homework. Doing your homework before you make your request will help you to have a confident manner.
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do your homework

examine thoroughly the details and background of a subject or topic, especially before giving your own views on it.
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do your ˈhomework (on something)

find out the facts, details, etc. of a subject in preparation for a meeting, a speech, an article, etc: He had just not done his homework for the interview. He couldn’t answer our questions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
If she has done her homework she will know that local authorities use prudential borrowing.
The opposition leader should have done her homework better and the First Minister should have had a better idea of his own policies.
Christopher had done her homework. She explored the postal service Website and learned what to do to pursue a partnership.
Sullivan's cornucopian sourcing, like the credit-worthy merchant's, is partly a rhetorical move designed to show that she has done her homework. Yet this thick forest of detail, like the merchant's, arguably conceals even as it persuades.
She often skips school because she has not done her homework. In the afternoons she is too busy training; she is a champion in synchronised skating.
She had done her homework about the history, culture, and language of Iran before going there and frequently refers to literature.
Connor has done her homework when it comes to researching the psychological problems of her characters.
She demonstrates she nearly always has done her homework, unearthing, for instance, that Nancy Boyd is an Edna St.
Go out and meet him.'" The ill-prepared maidens panicked and demanded of the others: "Give us some of your oil; our lamps are going out." (You remember that friend of yours in school who had never done her homework and always wanted to copy yours.)
It's equally rewarding to find a novel about African-Americans in corporate America where the writer has done her homework. Add some great descriptive narrative, humor, racism, sexual harassment, corporate politics and good old buppie angst and you've got Brothers and Sisters, a fictional account of a Los Angeles-based bank operations manager, Esther Jackson.