domino theory


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domino theory

1. The political theory that, if one country or area adopts communism, then the surrounding ones will as well. The domino theory was a major concern as the Soviet Union expanded its power after World War II.
2. By extension, the idea that an event in one country will result in similar events in the surrounding countries. The string of revolutions that occurred in neighboring countries during the Arab Spring was a great example of domino theory in action.
See also: domino, theory
References in periodicals archive ?
The truth is, of course, that the domino theory, like the mythical vampire, cannot cross water.
Belief in the domino theory can lead states to counter it after a defeat by looking for opportunities to use force, thereby producing a "domino theory paradox.
She also shows skill at phrase-making and insight Commenting on antagonism between the Reagan administration and Nicaragua's Sandinistas, she observes, "It was generational, a continuation of the war between Lester Lanin and Mick Jagger, neat Scotch and rolled joints, the domino theory and sit-ins.
Thus without shepherds or even a napalm star, the domino theory was born in a humble State Department manger.
Likewise, strategic beliefs that would justify widespread interventions--the domino theory, fears of a radical bandwagon, the notion that peace is indivisible, obsession with reputational precedents--are currently weak or absent among the great powers" (p.
This academic tenure domino theory discounts the concerns of administrators, trustees, students, and parents regarding faculty productivity and responsiveness to student needs.
Those of us who remember the Vietnam War recall "the domino theory.
v]), which is a restatement of the popular early seventeenth-century domino theory of encroaching catholocism, intended to justify a crusade against it.
A new variant of the domino theory will be upon us.
The roll call of horrors recited in Madness is best summarized by reference to the domino theory under which its central chapters are organized.
In 1957 the Communist - led insurgents, known as the Vietcong, began a brilliant campaign of guerrilla warfare against South Vietnam; in the United States, the concerns of the Kennedy and Johnson administrations about the " domino theory " -- that once a country fell to a Communist regime, its neighbors would also fall -- led to increased direct American involvement.
While applicable to both conflicts, the domino theory became firmly linked to the Vietnam War and to the perception that the exaggeration of this theory, had contributed greatly to the disaster in Vietnam.
BBC correspondent Fernando Ravsberg dismissed any possibility of such a domino theory hitting Cuba, noting that the island's dissidents were absolutely incapable of achieving significant mass mobilization (a view fully shared by the U.
The theory at the time was called the domino theory whereby Henry Kissinger argued that if you did not stop communist at Hanoi then the influence of China would dominate the region and state after state would go red.
If one accepts the validity of the domino theory, for example, then South Vietnam has strategic value and one must prevent its fall to the Communists.