do (one's) homework

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do (one's) homework

1. Literally, to complete the school work that has been assigned by a teacher to be done at home. You can't watch any more television until you do your homework!
2. To be thoroughly prepared and informed about something or something, especially in advance of some process, action, or decision. Be sure you do your homework before heading into that meeting; there's a lot at stake, and no one's going to like it if you aren't up to speed. I always do my homework before I make big purchases.
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do your homework

If you do your homework, you prepare for something, especially by finding out information about it. Before you buy any shares, do your homework. Doing your homework before you make your request will help you to have a confident manner.
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do your homework

examine thoroughly the details and background of a subject or topic, especially before giving your own views on it.
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do your ˈhomework (on something)

find out the facts, details, etc. of a subject in preparation for a meeting, a speech, an article, etc: He had just not done his homework for the interview. He couldn’t answer our questions.
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References in periodicals archive ?
EXCUSES for not doing your homework have ranged from " My dog ate it" to " There was no one to help me do it".
Successful partnering involves doing your homework. You must listen to the community first, and then design and build--with their input.
That is why our hearts are beating so"), all before getting home in time for supper, doing your homework, and not falling asleep.
Doing your homework -- your investment due diligence -- means going below the surface and beyond the general promises and platitudes of ASP strategy benefits.
Running for President without doing your homework can be devastating.