do (oneself or someone) an injustice

(redirected from doing you an injustice)

do (oneself or someone) an injustice

To do something that hinders or is detrimental to one. You're doing your kids an injustice by catering to their every whim—they need to learn to be independent.
See also: injustice

do yourself/somebody an inˈjustice

judge yourself/somebody unfairly: We may have been doing him an injustice. This work is good.
See also: injustice, somebody
References in periodicals archive ?
The guy who tells you to stare at your lure pattern is doing you an injustice; don't listen to him.
Venus isn't doing you an injustice with her move, she's thinking about how you're going to cope when stardom hits and rounding up some mates to help support you.
We would be doing you an injustice, if we idly stood by and watched attacks on USF and allowed deployers of new technology, such as VoIP, to game the system.
If I'm doing you an injustice, I apologise but there's a difference between being close to someone and too close.
Of course, I could be doing you an injustice and you've already done it.
Perhaps I am doing you an injustice, but you sound like a man who is more interested in his own pleasure than in a woman's.