do (oneself or someone) an injustice

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do (oneself or someone) an injustice

To view someone in an unfairly negative way. You're doing your kids an injustice by catering to their every whim—they need to learn to be independent.
See also: injustice

do yourself/somebody an inˈjustice

judge yourself/somebody unfairly: We may have been doing him an injustice. This work is good.
See also: injustice, somebody
References in classic literature ?
I may be doing them an injustice, but I fancy they were eager to get me (as the common phrase is) off their hands.
I'm sure I'm probably doing them an injustice but they just give me that impression and, without being over-critical, they don't seem to have the same affiliation with the people of Wexford as that team of '96.
It's difficult because you want to play for the team but you feel like you are doing them an injustice by not playing the way you know you are capable of.
Maybe, in highlighting the fact that Newcastle offered the lowest prize-money on the day in Britain at each of its latest two meetings, I was doing them an injustice.
It would be doing them an injustice to think that they wanted to seduce; they knew they had claws and sterile wombs, and they lamented this aloud.
I don't think I'm doing them an injustice,'' said Carter, a health care insurance professional from West Hills.
We would be doing them an injustice if we allowed him to come back in here until an apology is forthcoming, or some appropriate action is taken against him.