do (oneself or someone) an injustice

(redirected from doing him an injustice)

do (oneself or someone) an injustice

To view someone in an unfairly negative way. You're doing your kids an injustice by catering to their every whim—they need to learn to be independent.
See also: injustice

do yourself/somebody an inˈjustice

judge yourself/somebody unfairly: We may have been doing him an injustice. This work is good.
See also: injustice, somebody
References in classic literature ?
But the Square is so unaccustomed to the use of the moral terminology of Spaceland that I should be doing him an injustice if I were literally to transcribe his defence against this charge.
Actually I'm doing him an injustice, he's the best athlete we have.
I might be wrong and doing him an injustice, but I don't think he'd be that good on good, fast ground.
But Mr Hill's review considered far more than the headline re-organisation of school services - and to skim over his other findings would be doing him an injustice.
Though I may be doing him an injustice on that score.
Perhaps I'm doing him an injustice," Havel wrote, "but at that moment, I was overwhelmed by an intense feeling that this dear man belonged to a world that I no longer wish to have anything to do with--and Mr.
He said: "Johan has performed above and beyond the call of duty, and to call him consistent would be doing him an injustice.
Reading Altman as simply misogynistic is doing him an injustice, however.
Mastercraftsman won with authority on Saturday, and those who put his improved performance, compared with his run at Newmarket, down mainly to the testing ground are probably doing him an injustice.
But I think if you look at him just as a great athlete, you're doing him an injustice.