do (oneself or someone) an injustice

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do (oneself or someone) an injustice

To do something that hinders or is detrimental to one. You're doing your kids an injustice by catering to their every whim—they need to learn to be independent.
See also: injustice
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

do yourself/somebody an inˈjustice

judge yourself/somebody unfairly: We may have been doing him an injustice. This work is good.
See also: injustice, somebody
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017
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References in periodicals archive ?
The proprietors of this garbage are doing an injustice to the potential new wine drinkers out the're and unfortunately it is going to work against them in the long run.
I don't think the program should be scrapped; that would be doing an injustice to Michael and all the other astronauts.
David Woodhead, director of the Independent Schools Council Information Service, said: "This risks doing an injustice to individuals."
'Facelift' is perhaps doing an injustice to the French car's designers who have done major exterior surgery to the Clio's nose and tail.
But to blame Celtic's defeat on Lambert's dismissal would be doing an injustice to the winners.
Former scouts say that by losing sight of the values that provided them with the strength to live as openly gay men, the organization is doing an injustice to its members, straight and gay.
If I teach biology without evolution, I'd be doing an injustice to students, and to myself."
"Some journalism schools are doing an injustice by not giving their students a true range of what we do, day in and day out," says Eki.
More conservative preparers should consider that in light of the probable bankruptcy consequences, netting the receivable and the payable in order to arrive at the loan basis for deducting losses could actually be doing an injustice to the shareholder.