dog


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Financial, Acronyms, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Like this video? Subscribe to our free daily email and get a new idiom video every day!

dog

1. verb To judge or criticize someone for something. Why are you dogging me about this? It's really not a big deal.
2. verb To follow or pursue someone. You've been dogging me since I left the gas station—what's your deal, man?
3. verb To persistently trouble someone. I really think she should see a therapist if memories of the accident keep dogging her like that.
4. noun Something of poor quality. That movie was a real dog—I left before it was over.
5. noun An unattractive or unappealing female. I'm not asking that girl out—she's a real dog!
6. noun, slang The phone. The term comes from rhyming slang in which "dog" is short for "dog and bone," which rhymes with "phone." Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Is that the dog? Can someone answer it? My sister has been blabbing on the dog for hours every night ever since she got a boyfriend. It's so annoying.

dogs

The feet. Boy, are my dogs tired after all that walking!
See also: dog
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dog

1. n. a foot. (Usually plural.) I gotta get home and soak my dogs.
2. n. an ugly girl. (Rude and derogatory.) I’m no dog, but I could wish for some changes.
3. n. something undesirable or worthless; merchandise that no one wants to buy. Put the dogs out on the sale table so people will see them.
4. n. dog dung. (see also dog-doo.) There’s some dog on the lawn.
5. tv. to follow someone. The cop dogged Lefty for a week.
6. tv. to stay with one and haunt one. Will this memory dog me all the days of my life?
7. tv. to eat something; to eat something as a dog eats. He dogged his hamburger and ran out the door to catch the bus.
8. tv. to criticize someone or something. Stop dogging me about every little thing!
9. and dawg and dogg. n. buddy; friend. (Originally black. Also a term of address. The spelling variations do not affect pronunciation.) Hey, dog! Tsup? Word, dog.
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See:
References in classic literature ?
"Another time," I said to the dog-boy, "you will wash the great dog with Vixen when I send them home."
When I drove into my garden at the end of the day a soldier in white uniform scrambled over the wall at the far end, and the Garm that met me was a joyous dog. This happened twice or thrice a week for a month.
Even had Bashti's word gone forth that if Jerry were attacked by the full- grown bush dogs, it was the duty of the Somo folk to take his part and kick and stone and beat the bush dogs.
In the night the dog came again, took the Princess on his back and ran away with her to the Soldier, who was very much in love with her, and would have liked to have been a Prince, so that he might have had her for his wife.
The dog did not notice how the grains were strewn right from the castle to the Soldier's window, where he ran up the wall with the Princess.
"We've got six dogs," the other reiterated dispassionately.
"I won't say they was all dogs, but there was seven of 'm that got fish."
The big dog looked at him, howled again, and slunk away down the passage, while the other dogs drew aside right and left to give him ample room.
Kotuko grieved more for the loss of his dog than anything else; for though an Inuit eats enormously he also knows how to starve.
"Some dog, some points," he said aloud approvingly.
"Black, all black, every nail of them," said Daughtry, "an' as clean feet as ever a dog walked on, straight-out toes with the proper arch 'n' small 'n' not too small.
It was true, there were other dogs, There could not but be other dogs on so vast a place, but they did not count.
They growled and barked like detestable dogs, mewed, and flapped their arms and crowed.
Once, with a muttered imprecation, Kama leaped away, a stick of firewood in hand, and clubbed apart a tangle of fighting dogs. Daylight, between mouthfuls, fed chunks of ice into the tin pot, where it thawed into water.
The squabbling and bickering among the dogs had long since died down, and the weary animals were curled in the snow, each with his feet and nose bunched together and covered by his wolf's brush of a tail.