doctor

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(all) done up like a pox doctor's clerk

Dressed in a showy, flashy, or excessively fancy manner; overdressed. (The meaning of "pox doctor" in this context is not known.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. He showed up to the interview done up like a pox doctor's clerk. You could tell he was eager to make a good impression—maybe a bit too eager. Why are you all done up like a pox doctor's clerk? We're only going to the movies.
See also: clerk, done, like, pox, up

(all) dressed up like a pox doctor's clerk

Dressed in a showy, flashy, or excessively fancy manner; overdressed. Said especially of a man. (The meaning of "pox doctor" in this context is not known.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. He showed up to the interview dressed up like a pox doctor's clerk. You could tell he was eager to make a good impression—maybe a bit too eager. Why are you all dressed up like a pox doctor's clerk? We're only going to the movies.
See also: clerk, dress, like, pox, up

an apple a day keeps the doctor away

Eating healthy foods will keep one from getting sick (and needing to see a doctor). Primarily heard in US. Have an apple for a snack, instead of those chips. An apple a day keeps the doctor away, after all.
See also: apple, away, doctor, keep

be just what the doctor ordered

To be exactly what one needed or wanted. The phrase does not usually refer to one's actual medical needs. I've been working on this paper all week, so a night out with friends is just what the doctor ordered! This beach vacation was just what the doctor ordered—I've never felt more relaxed.
See also: doctor, just, order, what

Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

A humorous greeting. The phrase refers to Scottish explorer David Livingstone, who was presumed lost in Africa in the mid-19th century. When reporter H.M. Stanley finally located him, he supposedly greeted Livingstone with this now-famous phrase. You must be the gentleman I'm looking for—Doctor Livingstone, I presume?
See also: doctor

doctor up

1. To treat someone medically. A noun or pronoun can be used between "doctor" and "up." Oh, I cut my hand chopping vegetables and had to get doctored up, but I'm fine now.
2. To alter, and perhaps falsify, something in an attempt to improve it. A noun or pronoun can be used between "doctor" and "up." The studio says the we have to doctor the script up because it's too bland. Does this picture look fake to you? I think the defense team doctored it up.
See also: doctor, up

Doctors make the worst patients.

proverb It is difficult to give people help or advice on something in which they are professionals, because they often feel as though they already know better than anyone else how to handle the situation or perform a given task. Mary tried to convince her boss at the bank to see a credit advisor about his growing debt, but he kept insisting that he knew how to manage his money. Doctors make the worst patients.
See also: Doctor, make, worst

doctor's orders

Instructions given by one's doctor. Acting upon my doctor's orders, I cleared my schedule and spent the week recuperating at home. Samantha, you need to stay off your foot and use your crutches—doctor's orders, remember?
See also: order

dome-doctor

slang A psychologist or psychiatrist. "Dome" is slang term for "head." The phrase is usually used in a derogatory way. Ugh, I don't want to see a dome-doctor and talk about my feelings.

go for the doctor

To give something one's full effort or attention. Primarily heard in Australia. They are going for the doctor to win this game, but I will be very surprised if they beat the best team in the league.
See also: doctor, go

horse doctor

rude slang A physician who is regarded as poor or inept. You better get a second opinion on your condition because Dr. Jones strikes me as a horse doctor.
See also: doctor, horse

I'm a (something), not a (something else)

Used to emphasize one's status as a certain type of person to the exclusion of some other type. Modeled on the catch phrase of Dr. McCoy in the television series Star Trek, "I'm a doctor, not a (something)." A: "What do you think would be the best way to market our new app?" B: "Hey, don't ask me—I'm a programmer, not a salesperson." A: "Do you think you can repair the car?" B: "Lady, I'm a mechanic, not a miracle worker. This thing is totaled."
See also: not

just what the doctor ordered

Exactly the thing that is or was needed to help improve something or make one feel better. A short nap is just what the doctor ordered. You'll feel refreshed in no time. New lighting is just what the doctor ordered for the waiting room—it looks so much cheerier in here now!
See also: doctor, just, order, what

pox doctor's clerk

Someone who is overdressed or wearing a showy, flashy outfit. (The meaning of "pox doctor" in this context is not known.) Primarily heard in UK, Australia. Why are you all done up like a pox doctor's clerk? We're only going to the movies. Now that he's making big money, he always goes around looking like a pox doctor's clerk.
See also: clerk, pox

spin doctor

One who manipulates information, often by attempting to present negative news as being somehow positive. The campaign's spin doctors somehow made the candidate's poor performance in the debate look like a sign that he was the more relatable candidate.
See also: doctor, spin

wear (one's particular profession's) hat

To act as one would in one's particular profession while in a different setting. Bobby, I know you're off duty, but can you please wear your doctor's hat for five minutes and tell me what's wrong with my arm? I don't want to have to go to the hospital. My wife was still wearing her judge's hat when she tried to intervene with our neighbor's arguing kids.
See also: hat, particular, wear

you're the doctor

dated You are the one in charge or the one who knows best. Said as an indication that one will defer to the judgment of someone else (not an actual doctor). A: "No, I'd rather make the payment all at once, even if it results in a higher transaction fee." B: "OK, you're the doctor." A: "I'm telling you that the witness's life is in danger if she stays here!" B: "All right, all right—you're the doctor. So, what should we do with her, Detective?"
See also: doctor

zit doctor

slang A dermatologist. ("Zit" is slang for "pimple.") You may think she's little more than a zit doctor, but she saved my life when she discovered I had skin cancer two years ago! Why would I spend so much money just to have a zit doctor tell me I should keep using moisturizers and sun block?
See also: doctor, zit
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

An apple a day keeps the doctor away.

Prov. Apples are so nutritious that if you eat an apple every day, you will not ever need to go to a doctor. Remember to take an apple in your lunch today. An apple a day keeps the doctor away. Grandma always fed us lots of apples when we visited her. She believed that an apple a day keeps the doctor away.
See also: apple, away, doctor, keep

Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

Jocular You are who I think you are, are you not? Oh, there you are. Doctor Livingstone, I presume?
See also: doctor

doctor's orders something

that one is strongly advised to do as ordered or as if ordered by a doctor. I have to spend a month in Arizona. Doctor's orders. I'm doing this on doctor's orders, but I don't like it.
See also: order

doctor someone up

to give someone medical treatment, especially first aid. Give me a minute to doctor Fred up, and then we can continue our walk. I'll doctor up Fred with a bandage; you can go on ahead.
See also: doctor, up

just what the doctor ordered

Fig. exactly what is required, especially for health or comfort. That meal was delicious, Bob. Just what the doctor ordered. Bob: Would you like something to drink? Mary: Yes, a cold glass of water would be just what the doctor ordered.
See also: doctor, just, order, what

spin doctor

someone who gives a twisted or deviously deceptive version of an event. (Usually in the context of manipulating the news for political reasons.) Things were going bad for the candidate, so he got himself a new spin doctor. A good spin doctor could have made the incident appear far less damaging.
See also: doctor, spin

You're the doctor.

Inf. Fig. You are in a position to tell me what to do.; I yield to you and your knowledge of this matter. (Usually jocular; the person being addressed is most likely not a physician.) Bill: Eat your dinner, then you'll feel more like playing ball. Get some energy! Tom: Okay, you're the doctor. Teacher: You'd better study the first two chapters more thoroughly. Bob: You're the doctor.
See also: doctor
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

apple a day

A small preventive treatment wards off serious problems, as in He exercises regularly-an apple a day is his motto. This idiom shortens the proverb An apple a day keeps the doctor away, first cited about 1630.
See also: apple

just what the doctor ordered

Exactly what was needed. For example, This steak is just what the doctor ordered, or You've been a great help in our office-just what the doctor ordered. This expression alludes to a physician's prescription for a cure. [First half of 1900s]
See also: doctor, just, order, what

spin doctor

An individual charged with getting others to interpret a statement or event from a particular viewpoint, as in Charlie is the governor's spin doctor. This term, born about 1980 along with spin control, uses doctor in the colloquial sense of "one who repairs something."
See also: doctor, spin
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

just what the doctor ordered

If you say that something is just what the doctor ordered, you mean that it is extremely enjoyable or useful and helps to make you feel better or to improve a situation. `Meatballs in tomato sauce!' Max exclaimed happily. `Just what the doctor ordered.' A few days' break in Honolulu was just what the doctor ordered.
See also: doctor, just, order, what
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

be just what the doctor ordered

be very beneficial or desirable under the circumstances. informal
1948 Gore Vidal The City and the Pillar The waiter brought her a drink. ‘Just what the doctor ordered,’ she said, smiling at him.
See also: doctor, just, order, what

go for the doctor

make an all-out effort. Australian informal
See also: doctor, go
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

just what the doctor ˈordered

(humorous, saying) exactly what somebody wants or needs: Ah, a long, cool, refreshing drink! Just what the doctor ordered!
See also: doctor, just, order, what
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

doctor up

v.
1. To falsify or change something in such a way as to make it favorable: The corrupt lawyer doctored up the evidence. I doctored the photo up to make myself look younger.
2. To modify something so as to improve or conceal its taste or appearance: The chef doctored up the bland fish by seasoning it heavily. I doctored the eggs up with a little oregano.
See also: doctor, up
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

couch-doctor

and couch-turkey
n. a psychiatrist; a psychoanalyst. I finally walked out on my couch-doctor. Now I’m getting it all together. I bought three new cars for that couch-turkey! Now I’m paying for his kid’s college!

dome-doctor

n. a psychologist or psychiatrist. The dome-doctor lets me talk while he keeps score.

horse doctor

n. a doctor. (Derogatory. Originally referred to a veterinarian.) That horse doctor says there’s nothing wrong with me.
See also: doctor, horse

just what the doctor ordered

n. exactly what is needed. This nice cool beer is just what the doctor ordered.
See also: doctor, just, order, what

spin doctor

n. someone who provides an interpretation of news or an event in a way that makes the news or event work to the advantage of the entity employing the spin doctor. (Usually in political contexts in reference to manipulating the news.) Things were going bad for the president, so he got himself a new spin doctor.
See also: doctor, spin

You’re the doctor

sent. I will do anything you say!; You are in charge! Put it over here. Okay, you’re the doctor.
See also: doctor

zit doctor

n. a dermatologist. The zit doctor I went to was a crater-face!
See also: doctor, zit
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.

an apple a day (keeps the doctor away)

A proverbial preventive remedy. Versions of this saying date from the seventeenth century or earlier, appearing in John Ray’s proverb collection of 1670 and elsewhere. A cliché by the late nineteenth century, it gave rise to numerous humorous versions, such as “A stanza a day to keep the wolf away” by the poet Phyllis McGinley.
See also: apple, doctor
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer

Doctor Livingstone, I presume?

A 19th-century explorer named Dr. David Livingstone became something of a national hero through his articles and lectures about his adventures in Africa. In 1864, Livingstone led an expedition to discover the source of the Nile. When little to nothing was heard from or about Livingstone after many years, Europeans and Americans became concerned. In 1871, the publisher of the New York Herald hired Henry Stanley, a newspaper reporter, to find Livingstone. Heading a group of some two hundred men, Stanley headed into the African interior. After nearly eight months he found Livingstone in a small village on the shore of Lake Tanganyika. As Stanley described the encounter, “As I advanced slowly toward him I noticed he was pale, looked wearied . . . I would have embraced him, only, he being an Englishman, I did not know how he would receive me; so I . . . walked deliberately to him, took off my hat, and said, ‘Dr. Livingstone, I presume?' The phrase “‘Dr. Livingstone, I presume?” caught the public's fancy, and any number of would-be wits greeted friends with it until the phrase lost all traces of cleverness. But that never stopped people from continuing to use it long past the public's memory of who Livingstone or Stanley were.
See also: doctor
Endangered Phrases by Steven D. Price Copyright © 2011 by Steven D. Price
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In the doctoral program at Carleton, we have experienced stricter enforcement of completion times by the university, reduction of funding for graduate students and a corresponding increase in pressure for them to take on paid work, ongoing serious concerns with mental health issues among students, and increased pressure on graduate students to undertake teaching duties before completing their program as a professional development opportunity.
(2004) assessed both the number of doctoral students graduating each year and the quality of preparation of these future faculty members for a career in academe.
Doctoral candidates should seek a supervisor who assists them to connect the dots and logically connect concepts found in literature and methodology techniques without too much metaphorical handholding.
Exhibit 2 also provides a gender comparison within doctoral and nondoctoral programs, again showing little difference.
Doctoral student socialization is a major area of doctoral education research and has been written about extensively (Gardner, 2008; 2009; Weidman, Twale, & Stein, 2001; Weidman & Stein, 2003; Tierney, 1997).
The Chairman appreciated the French Government and higher education institutions for academic collaboration with Pakistan in the shape of doctoral and post-doctoral opportunities.
The first section of this paper reveals the major findings on the eleven Armenian HEIs' (consortium partners) state of arts in comparison to the Salzburg principles, while in the second section the recommendations are made on the alignment of the Armenian doctoral education to the Salzburg principles.
Doctoral scientists and engineers had a 1.2% unemployment rate in the summer of 1973 according to a report prepared for the National Science Foundation.
These are questions that were raised by Morehead State University, a Midwestern regional university, 6 years ago when development began on its first institutional doctoral program, the doctor of education (EdD) in educational leadership, with a track in educational technology leadership.
Doctoral students working in health research are increasingly affected by these budget cuts.
We completed both a survey of doctoral students and recent graduates, as well as a survey of enrollment information in the doctoral programs in Georgia.
The five scholars asked: "How well are doctoral programs preparing nurses for the faculty roles that will be needed?"
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