do unto others as you would have them do unto you

Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.

Treat other people the way you would like to be treated yourself. Based on the words of Jesus at his Sermon on the Mount (and known widely as The Golden Rule), variations of the phrase have been a core doctrine of societal ethics throughout modern human history. I told my son the only way to get along with people is to do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
See also: have, other, unto

do unto others as you would have them do unto you

Behave toward others as you would like to have them behave toward you, as in Of course I'll help him out; it's a case of do unto others, and I may be in the same boat one day . This so-called golden rule is stated in just about every ancient writing about behavioral precepts (including the New Testament, Talmud, Koran, and the Analects of Confucius). Among the earliest appearances in English is Earl Rivers' translation of a saying of Socrates ( Dictes and Sayenges of the Philosophirs, 1477): "Do to other as thou wouldst they should do to thee, and do to none other but as thou wouldst be done to." It is so well known that it is often shortened.
See also: have, other, unto
References in periodicals archive ?
The most important people are you and I, going about our daily chores and lending a hand to others, ever mindful of the teachings of the Bible: "Love thy neighbour as thyself" and "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you".
One such proverb states: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." This, of course, has been changed today to state: "Do unto others before they do you."
We might not get "actionable intelligence" out of POW's by treating them by the standards of the Geneva Convention (do unto others as you would have them do unto you), but at least we'd be doing the right thing, the moral Christian thing.
The Kilcooleys' action was simply part of their habitual practice of the Golden Rule--to do unto others as you would have them do unto you. Mrs.
Hans Kung points out that one of the principles basic to most religions and moral systems is the Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you (1998, p.
Humanity, innately aware of this fact, has been creating for thousands of years treaties for the securing of human rights and law based on a single premise echoed in every major religion or system of ethics worldwide: "do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Countless documents, including the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights, have been derived from this affirmation of the inherent worth of each human being.
DO UNTO others as you would have them do unto you. It's a phrase that's often misquoted as "do unto others as they do unto you".
"Walk a mile in another's (non-leather) moccasins before passing judgment." "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." We know these platitudes well, and yet our own intense desires for justice often conflict with the empathy necessary to make these "golden rules" work for us.
The first is The Golden Rule: Do unto others as you would have them do unto you. This philosophy is a central component m most religious teachings throughout the world.
Dyson: The golden rule - do unto others as you would have them do unto you - is particularly suited to the Net.
This is not what "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you" really means.
Because I believe at the root of all these various theories is a simple, practical idea that was best phrased about 2000 years ago: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you."
Law enforcement personnel can achieve such understanding quite simply by remembering the "Golden Rule": Do unto others as you would have them do unto you.
My preferred version reads simply: "Do unto others as you would have them do unto you." Can there be a more cogent moral teaching than that?