do the honors, to

do the honors

To perform a task or duty of an official nature, often in a social setting. Sometimes used humorously. Why don't you do the honors and greet people at the door? I'll take their coats. Joe, do the honors and cut me a slice of that pizza, will you? The mayor was supposed to cut the ribbon, but he can't make it, so we'll have to find someone else to do the honors.
See also: honor

do the honors

Act as a host or hostess, performing introductions and otherwise attending to guests. For example, At home Mary leaves it to Bill to do the honors when they have guests. This expression uses honors in the sense of "courtesy." [Mid-1600s]
See also: honor

do the honors, to

To render courtesies to guests; to act as a host, making introductions, carving the turkey, and the like. This expression was being used by 1700. It appears in Alexander Pope’s Imitations of Horace (1737): “Then hire a Slave, or (if you will), a Lord, to do the Honours, and to give the Word.”