do so

do so

Used for emphasis to insist that one does, has done, or has something. The phrase typically ends the sentence or is followed by a verb. A: "I don't think you finished your homework." B: "I did so!" A: "Honey, you're fine. You don't have a fever." B: "I do so have a fever! Feel my forehead again!"
References in periodicals archive ?
300 yards." You can't break up everything of course, but you should do so where it makes sense.
All the drugs, prophylactics, therapies and palliatives in the world are of little value (and even less nobility) unless those administering them do so with a moral sense of obligation and prohibition, professionalism, justice and honesty, compassion and concern.
"I can't remember if we have ever said `no.' The only time a typical CPA firm would be reluctant to do so would be when there was a threat of litigation involved, at which point it would start funneling requests through its lawyers.
But Karel and Andrew are the first gay talk jocks to hold such a high-profile slot--and definitely the first romantically attached gay couple to do so. In a flash after their March 22 debut the duo became the poster boys for queerdom on talk radio.
And it can't be; companies don't have the money to stage a new, eye-catching, opulent narrative ballet each season, even if they desire to do so, which they don't.
But these reports didn't try to answer the question; they just encouraged departments to do so.
Products that force the user to reboot back to DOS do so because they are unable to image open files, particularly files on the system partition.
When you're ready to come down, do so on a very long, slow exhalation.
Perhaps in exchange for information, you can promise the confessor you'll provide the reference instead of letting his/her current boss do so or give him her a glowing written reference.
With few exceptions, they can do so whether your computer environment is DOS, Windows, Unix, OS/2, a network, a mainframe or a Macintosh.
"Never expect anyone to engage in a behavior that serves your values unless you give that person adequate reason to do so."[3]