dizzy

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dizzy heights

1. An impressive level of success. "Dizzying heights" is a more common version of the phrase. Primarily heard in UK. Your company will never reach such dizzy heights if you don't devote your full attention to it.
2. A high or extreme degree of something. Primarily heard in UK. Why are our profits now so much lower than the dizzy heights they reached last month?
See also: dizzy, height

dizzy with a dame

old-fashioned Obsessed or preoccupied with a woman, usually romantically. I hardly see Paul at all these days—he must be dizzy with a dame or something.
See also: dame, dizzy

dizzying heights

1. An impressive level of success. Your company will never reach such dizzying heights if you don't devote your full attention to it.
2. A high or extreme degree of something. Why are our profits now so much lower than the dizzying heights they reached last month?
See also: dizzy, height
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dizzy heights

BRITISH or

dizzying heights

COMMON
1. You use dizzy heights or dizzying heights to talk about a very high level of success. She had first known such dizzy heights in the 1960's when she became one of the top exponents of black American music. She was a poor girl propelled to the dizzying heights of fame by a group of powerful agents. Note: This expression is sometimes used ironically to say that someone has not achieved very much at all. After three and a half years, I had reached the dizzy heights of assistant account handler.
2. You use dizzy heights or dizzying heights to talk about a very high amount or level of something. The Dow Jones has scaled the dizzy heights to reach 10,000. The cost of oil imports reached dizzying heights before falling back and rising again in 1990. Note: This expression is sometimes used ironically to say that something is not at a very high level. The meat content of the pie can soar to the dizzy heights of 25 per cent.
See also: dizzy, height
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

dizzy

mod. stupid; scatterbrained. Who is that dizzy dame?
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Cliches of Jews and Others,' uses a dizzying array of objects and images to plumb our collective unconscious."
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Wiley should figure his desire even more than he has, keep dreaming of a baroque while considering Stuart Davis, Philip Guston, and Barkley Hendricks (in terms of, respectively, abstract design and palette intensity; strangely historical yet phantasmatically loaded figuration and dizzying paint handling; and subtle, erotic beatification).
The thirty-minute ballet is filled with pools of dizzying white light that hits the stage from all angles so that neither the performers nor the audience know quite where they are or can identify the place or time.
Thunderstorm clouds in hurricane Bonnie punched their way up to dizzying heights, according to images collected by a rain-sensing satellite.
If the movie is visually dizzying, stridently overacted, and beyond tasteless, it's also staggeringly ambitious and the next best thing to irresistible.
This book gives us selected readings from a dizzying variety of lesbian and gay spiritual visionaries--Sappho to Michelangelo, Emily Dickinson to Dag Hammarskjold.
The other 19 participants seemed to accept being turned upside down more or less benignly; i each, the subject closed his or her eyes, lost on a dizzying inward journey of blissful oblivion.
Like a revved-up giant lighthouse, a rapidly rotating neutron star near the Milky Way's center beams radio waves toward Earth at a dizzying rate of 86 times a second.