dispose of (someone or something)

(redirected from dispose of something)

dispose of (someone or something)

1. To eliminate someone or something; to get rid of someone or something. The CEO is apt to dispose of any manager who does not agree with him all the time. After our basement flooded, we had to dispose of most of the boxes we'd stored down there.
2. To settle or resolve something. Jean is the best editor in the writing center, so she'll definitely dispose of any issues in your paper.
3. To relocate, sell, or give something away. Once I move into the city, I'll need to dispose of my car.
4. slang To kill someone. We need to dispose of the informant before he goes running to the police again.
See also: dispose, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dispose of someone or something

to get rid of someone or something. (See also dispose of someone.) How can I dispose of this bothersome customer? Where shall I dispose of this wastepaper?
See also: dispose, of

dispose of someone

Sl. to kill someone. (See also dispose of someone or something.) Max suggested that he would dispose of Lefty if Lefty continued to be a pest. The boss ordered Max to dispose of Lefty.
See also: dispose, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dispose of

1. Attend to, settle, deal with, as in He quickly disposed of the problem. [Early 1600s]
2. Transfer, part with, as by giving away or selling. For example, They wanted to dispose of the land as soon as possible. [Second half of 1600s]
3. Get rid of, throw out, as in Can we dispose of the trash in this barrel? Oliver Goldsmith had this idiom in She Stoops to Conquer (1773): "I'm disposing of the husband before I have secured the lover." [Mid-1600s]
4. Kill or destroy; also, humorously, consume. For example, The king was determined to dispose of his enemies, or John disposed of the cake in no time. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: dispose, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dispose of

v.
1. To throw out or get rid of something: The government hired contractors to dispose of the nuclear waste.
2. To settle or attend to some problem, question, or situation: We quickly disposed of the problem before anyone found out.
3. To transfer or part with something, as by giving away or selling it: The bank disposed of its bad loans.
4. To kill or destroy someone: The dictator disposed of all his enemies.
See also: dispose, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dispose of someone

in. to kill someone. The boss ordered Max to dispose of Lefty.
See also: dispose, of, someone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
See also:
References in classic literature ?
She then began to look about her for a shop in which she might dispose of something for the moment.
The booths will afford passengers privacy so if they intend to dispose of something that might cause them embarrassment, they will be protected, the MIAA official told the Inquirer, adding that a passenger will not be questioned on the item he or she got rid of.
Having to make excessively long journeys to recycle or dispose of something safely, defeats the purpose.
How brilliant it would be if you were able to dispose of something you no longer wanted without guilt or hassle; you could just take it back to the shop.
"The best way for (the recipient of an unwanted gift) to dispose of something is to resell it online or regift it," Collier says.
Belle catches Jules attempting to dispose of something in a skip and tries to warn Drew he is up to no good.
"Our dispensing operation is fundamentally strong and you don't just dispose of something because it isn't doing well in the short term.
Forbes also managed to dispose of something more valuable.
How Do I Dispose of Something That Has Mercury in It (a Thermostat, Thermometer, an Old Toy, Light Bulb, etc.)?
Growth for any business always involves a combination of initiatives: organic growth, partnerships and alliances or mergers/acquisitions or divestitures are strategies to fill a void, enhance an already-popular area or dispose of something that does not align with a company's strategic direction.
When the chef needs to dispose of something, he or she simply steps on the foot pedal, tosses the item into the can, and continues cooking.
Nationally it costs the taxpayer about pounds 40 million to dispose of something that will still fill a landfill site in 200 years, complete with its chemicals, gels and plastics, which do not break down and which hinder the decomposition of other rubbish.
Now, when I'm trying to decide whether to keep or dispose of something for myself, I try to consider: 1, Do I have a reasonable expectation of using this?
The booths will afford passengers privacy so if they intend to dispose of something that might cause them embarrassment, they will be protected, the MIAA official told the Philippine Daily Inquirer, adding that a passenger would not be questioned on the item he or she got rid of.