dispose of (someone or something)

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dispose of (someone or something)

1. To eliminate someone or something; to get rid of someone or something. The CEO is apt to dispose of any manager who does not agree with him all the time. After our basement flooded, we had to dispose of most of the boxes we'd stored down there.
2. To settle or resolve something. Jean is the best editor in the writing center, so she'll definitely dispose of any issues in your paper.
3. To relocate, sell, or give something away. Once I move into the city, I'll need to dispose of my car.
4. slang To kill someone. We need to dispose of the informant before he goes running to the police again.
See also: dispose, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dispose of someone or something

to get rid of someone or something. (See also dispose of someone.) How can I dispose of this bothersome customer? Where shall I dispose of this wastepaper?
See also: dispose, of

dispose of someone

Sl. to kill someone. (See also dispose of someone or something.) Max suggested that he would dispose of Lefty if Lefty continued to be a pest. The boss ordered Max to dispose of Lefty.
See also: dispose, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

dispose of

1. Attend to, settle, deal with, as in He quickly disposed of the problem. [Early 1600s]
2. Transfer, part with, as by giving away or selling. For example, They wanted to dispose of the land as soon as possible. [Second half of 1600s]
3. Get rid of, throw out, as in Can we dispose of the trash in this barrel? Oliver Goldsmith had this idiom in She Stoops to Conquer (1773): "I'm disposing of the husband before I have secured the lover." [Mid-1600s]
4. Kill or destroy; also, humorously, consume. For example, The king was determined to dispose of his enemies, or John disposed of the cake in no time. [Second half of 1800s]
See also: dispose, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dispose of

v.
1. To throw out or get rid of something: The government hired contractors to dispose of the nuclear waste.
2. To settle or attend to some problem, question, or situation: We quickly disposed of the problem before anyone found out.
3. To transfer or part with something, as by giving away or selling it: The bank disposed of its bad loans.
4. To kill or destroy someone: The dictator disposed of all his enemies.
See also: dispose, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Phrasal Verbs. Copyright © 2005 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

dispose of someone

in. to kill someone. The boss ordered Max to dispose of Lefty.
See also: dispose, of, someone
McGraw-Hill's Dictionary of American Slang and Colloquial Expressions Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in classic literature ?
First taking another look at the pretty little hand and fingers, to make certain the thimble might not be reclaimed, when satisfied that it really belonged to her who wished to dispose of it, she ventured to answer.
If folk can afford to buy stuff regardless of how big or small then they can afford to dispose of it properly!
If a drug is long past its expiration date and it's vital that it be 100 percent effective, dispose of it and get a new medication.
Glitter in your recycling QQ Tinsel is not recyclable, so if it has finally lost its sparkle please dispose of it in your household bin.
It would be lunacy for me to drive seven miles, burning fossil fuels, to dispose of it in my nearest council centre.
Coun David Bithell, Wrexham's Lead Member for Environment and Transport said: "While the majority of dog owners are socially responsible, there are those who do not pick up their dog's mess, or do not dispose of it properly by hanging dog bags from trees."
His crime was not to check that the person who offered to take away his rubbish was registered to dispose of it legally.
"Recyclers could be liable if they know they possess consumer report information and they do not dispose of it properly," says Katherine Armstrong, an attorney in the division of finance for the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), which is responsible for FACTA.
Wipe off any FRH with a rag and dispose of it properly.
"It was easier just to dispose of it than to store it."
Dry cleaners and other businesses that use perc must dispose of it as hazardous waste.
And until now, dumping bags of the fire-retarding and insulating fibers in landfills was the primary way to dispose of it.
For example, one high school in Massachusetts spends $100,000 to dispose of its trash, but nothing on health and safety programs.