dismiss

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dismiss (someone or something) as (something)

To reject someone or something by viewing or designating it in a particular way. The studio may dismiss me as a dumb blonde, but I'll show them how versatile an actress I can be! The candidate dismissed the negative report about him as a total fabrication.
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dismiss someone

(from something ) (for something) to discharge someone from employment for some reason; to fire someone from a job for some cause. We will have to dismiss him from employment for absenteeism. She was dismissed from the bank for making many errors in one month.

dismiss something as something

to put something out of one's mind or ignore something as something. (The second something can be a noun or an adjective.) I dismissed the whole idea as foolishness. It was not possible to dismiss the whole matter as a one-time happening. Molly dismissed the whole event as accidental.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Your memorialists therefore humbly shew, that the very Existence of Performers depends on the Caprice of Proprietors, and that by the Power they possess of excluding them from the Exercise of their Profession by Dismission, they have the Means of reducing them to Compliance with whatever Terms they may think proper to retain them at.
Nevertheless, any sentence of a general court-martial "extending to the loss of life, the dismission of a commissioned officer, or which shall respect the general officer, shall, with the whole proceedings of such cases, respectively, be laid before the President of the United States, who is hereby authorized to direct the same to be carried into execution, or otherwise, as he shall judge proper.
My conduct may I fear be objectionable in having accepted my dismission from your daughter's lips instead of your own.
77, he wrote that the Chief Executive would at all times be "liable to impeachment, trial, dismission from office, incapacity to serve in any other, and to the forfeiture of life and estate by subsequent prosecution in the common course of law.
Refusing to submit to what they regarded as a groundless policy, fifty-one students, the majority of the seminary's population, asked for and were granted honorable dismission.
At the recesses and at dismission, this marching is repeated.