disk


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disc jockey

One who selects and plays music for the public, as on a radio station or at a party or event. Commonly abbreviated as "DJ." Man, this disc jockey is terrible—no one is dancing. I love that disc jockey's radio show—she always plays the best music.
See also: disc, jockey

disk jockey

and deejay and disc jockey and DJ
n. a radio announcer who introduces music from phonograph records. (see also veejay.) The disk jockey couldn’t pronounce the name of the singing group.
See also: disk, jockey

disc jockey

verb
See also: disc, jockey
References in periodicals archive ?
Recovery speed, in particular, can be notably faster: Data can be accessed directly from disk (assuming the data still resides on disk and has not been archived to tape); it does not have to be "re-assembled" as it would in tape implementations that rely on multiplexing to boost backup performance.
For this reason, WORM disk technology is becoming more widely accepted for audit, archive and imaging applications.
The team calculates that the inner edge of the disk is only twice as far away from the hole's center as is the event horizon.
Astronomers used to think that all protoplanetary disks are shaped basically like Frisbees.
*1 As of July 14, 2005, based on a JVC survey, no other consumer camcorder offers a built-in hard disk drive and MPEG-2 recording.
Policies in the 2.0 release include the ability to retain key data on disk for faster recovery of historical information, automated creation of up to four copies of data for redundant protection, and retention of local copies of data after a copy has been exported.
If an entry-level RAID controller costs $800 while a standard controller costs $400 and its 9GB drives cost $800 each, a disk drive subsystem would cost $3,200; users would be paying a 38% premium for RAID-5 protection.
If compressing your entire hard disk makes you apprehensive or you don't need that much added space, there is an intermediate solution: zipping individual files or programs and storing them in compressed form either on a hard disk or on some other convenient medium.
The computer had a screen with 320 by 200 resolution, I believe, no hard disk drive (I added one later), 128 K of RAM, and a 14 inch color monitor.
Today, the bank can store an entire month's reports and records on a single 940-MB write-once disk for about $145.
Disks are numbered as they are filled up, and stored in numerical order with a listing of files written on the outside of each disk.
New images from Hubble's Advanced Camera for Surveys provide firm evidence of the second disk, David Golimowski of Johns Hopkins University in Baltimore and his colleagues report in the June Astronomical Journal.
This technology is significantly different than magnetic disk and tape emulation since the Write Once properties of UDO are inherent to the recording surface of the media and are not a function of software or firmware controls.
Advanced Digital Information Corporation (Nasdaq:ADIC), supplier of intelligent storage solutions for the open system market, announced recently an expansion of its Pathlight VX disk-to-tape backup solution that will bring the benefits of disk performance, RAID fault tolerance, and an integrated path to tape to a larger community of IT end users.