disentangle

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disentangle (someone or something) from (someone or something)

To untangle someone or something from someone or something else. There are so many cords plugged into this outlet that it will take us all day to disentangle each from the other. I had to disentangle the twins from each other a few times when they started fighting over a toy, but otherwise they were very well behaved.
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disentangle someone or something from someone or something

to untangle someone or something from someone or something. I helped disentangle Tony from the coils of ropes he had stumbled into. They worked feverishly to disentangle the dolphin from the net. He disentangled himself from the net.
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References in periodicals archive ?
The group, which includes a priest and rabbi as consultants on religious matters, also clears up religious misconceptions and disentangles faith-based beliefs from customs to help couples find room for compromise, says Dan Josephs, who is Catholic.
Finkelstein's account sometimes too cleanly disentangles Jewish nationalism from the European theater, whose xenophobia and persistent anti-Semitism were certainly critical to Zionism's emergence.
Unlike his twentieth century psychiatrists who separate religion from its underlying psychological cause, Rubin never quite disentangles himself from the conviction that Protestantism is the cause of religious melancholy.
Michael Jaffe disentangles the attribution of two versions of Van Dyck's portrait of Sir Edmund Verney, identifying the hand of the master from a studio product.
She disentangles the social and scientific processes of searching for an autism gene to reveal new truths, new citizens, and new biosocial communities of autism.
The author disentangles the various strands in this awesome confrontation with skill and he also balances the wider view with an attention to the detail that brings it all back to life.
Von Maltzahn disentangles some of them, including the relationship of the so-called "Digression" (into the state of England in 1649) to the rest of the text.