disease


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Related to disease: heart disease, communicable disease

Christmas disease

Hemophilia (or haemophilia) B, a blood-clotting disorder in which a mutation of the Factor IX gene leads to a deficiency of Factor IX (or Christmas factor), a serine protease of the coagulation system. Both the factor and the disease are named for Stephen Christmas (not the holiday), the first patient discovered to have the condition in 1952. We haven't let our daughter participate in any more physical sports since she was diagnosed with Christmas disease last year.
See also: Christmas, disease

desperate diseases must have desperate remedies

Extreme and undesirable circumstances or situations can only be resolved by resorting to equally extreme actions. I know that the austerity measures introduced by the government during the recession are unpopular, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

the disease to please

A constant need to make others happy. I think you're miserable because you have the disease to please. Try doing what makes you happy instead.
See also: disease, please

the British disease

That which supposedly plagues British people, government, or society. Used especially in reference to an inability or unwillingness to be as productive as possible. The real British disease is not complacency or unrest, but the desire to achieve short-term at the cost of investing in long-term, sustainable economic policies.
See also: British, disease

Desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

Prov. If you have a seemingly insurmountable problem, you must do things you ordinarily would not do in order to solve it. Fred: All my employees have been surly and morose for months. How can I improve their morale? Alan: Why not give everyone a raise? Fred: That's a pretty extreme suggestion. Alan: Yes, but desperate diseases must have desperate remedies.

(the) disease to please

an obsessive need to please people. I, like so many, am afflicted with the disease to please. I am just too nice for my own good.
See also: disease, please

*down with a disease

ill; sick at home. (Can be said about many diseases. *Typically: be ~; Come ~; get~.) Tom isn't here. He's down with a cold. Sally is down with the flu.
See also: disease, down

foot-in-mouth disease

the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. I suffer a lot from foot-in-mouth disease. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

shake a disease or illness off

Fig. [for the body] to fight off a disease or illness. I thought I was catching a cold, but I guess I shook it off. I hope I can shake off this flu pretty soon.
See also: disease, illness, off, shake

foot in one's mouth, put one's

Say something foolish, embarrassing, or tactless. For example, Jane put her foot in her mouth when she called him by her first husband's name. This notion is sometimes put as having foot-in-mouth disease, as in He has a bad case of foot-in-mouth disease, always making some tactless remark. The first expression dates from about 1900. The variant, dating from the mid-1900s, is a play on the foot-and-mouth (sometimes called hoof-and-mouth) disease that afflicts cattle, causing eruptions to break out around the mouth and hoofs.
See also: foot, put

the British disease

a problem or failing supposed to be characteristically British, especially (formerly) a proneness to industrial unrest. informal
See also: British, disease

foot-in-mouth disease

n. the tendency to say the wrong thing at the wrong time. Well, Ralph has foot-in-mouth disease again.
See also: disease

white man’s disease

n. the inability to jump in basketball. You break your leg, Walter? Or you got a case of white man’s disease.
See also: disease, white
References in periodicals archive ?
The issue highlights efforts directed at identifying disease reservoirs and finding better ways to understand, evaluate, prevent, and control disease transmission.
Although saliva, blood, and brain tissue transmitted the disease, three oral doses of mixed urine and feces didn't have an effect.
Recent estimates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in the U.
One associates the disease with a specific infectious process; the other attributes it to a disturbance of the immune system.
Although it affects men and women at nearly the same rates (women are slightly more likely to get Alzheimer's disease than men), Alzheimer's disease has particular relevance for women, notes Laurel Coleman, MD, a member of the Alzheimer's Association's board of directors and a practicing geriatrician in Augusta, ME.
Parasitologist Peter Daszak, executive director of CCM, cites the West Nile Virus as an example of an emerging human disease transmitted from animal carriers, which is encouraged by greater international travel and commerce.
Shu Chen, associate director of the National Prion Disease Pathology Surveillance Center at Case Western Reserve University in Cleveland, Ohio, explains why: "The current understanding is the prion is an infectious agent made up of an abnormal form of protein.
If we can successfully combine Oxagen's approach to the understanding of the genetic components of disease in humans, with our ability to rapidly and cost-effectively evaluate a phenotypic disease response, we will have a powerful system to help identify and develop novel compounds with wide applicability.
As the disease progresses, infected cattle become very agitated, kicking violently with no provocation.
As the examples illustrate, screening exams are generally done to look for a particular disease or condition, and they should generally be done only when clinical studies have demonstrated that screening exams may do more good than harm.
If foot-and-mouth disease were to enter the United States, the cost is in the billions.
This approach located the genes for Huntington's disease and cystic fibrosis, but proved to be unsuccessful in studying diseases like asthma.
The machine is currently at the center of a heated debate: Is the ability to pick up extremely early traces of heart disease medically useful, or is the ultrafast CT just an overpriced scare tactic with no real diagnostic value?
Many of the symptoms of the disease described by contemporaries, especially during epidemics of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries, are strikingly inconsistent with those of bubonic plague.
Depression may make it harder to take the medications needed and to carry out the treatment for heart disease.