discretion

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Related to discretionally: discrete, discretionarily

throw discretion to the wind(s)

To act or behave recklessly and/or fearlessly, with no sense of restraint or propriety. (An older variant of the now more common "throw caution to the wind(s).") After my father won a bit of money at the race tracks, he began throwing discretion to the winds and ended up gambling away everything we had. You can't live life completely reserved, you know—you've got to throw discretion to the wind every now and then.
See also: discretion, throw

the soul of discretion

Someone who can be trusted to keep information private. Don't worry, my sister is the soul of discretion—she won't tell anyone about our engagement before we do.
See also: discretion, of, soul

discretion is the better part of valor

Caution is more important than bravery. I know you want to try that risky skateboard jump, but remember that discretion is the better part of valor.
See also: better, discretion, of, part

Discretion is the better part of valor.

Prov. It is good to be brave, but it is also good to be careful.; If you are careful, you will not get into situations that require you to be brave. Son: Can I go hang gliding with my friends? Father: No. Son: But they'll say I'm chicken if I don't go! Father: Discretion is the better part of valor, and I'd rather have them call you chicken than risk your life.
See also: better, discretion, of, part

ounce of discretion is worth a pound of wit

Prov. Knowing when to refrain from making jokes is better than being able to make jokes all the time. Mabel makes fun of everybody, regardless of whether or not she hurts their feelings. Someone should tell her that an ounce of discretion is worth a pound of wit.
See also: discretion, of, ounce, pound, wit, worth

discretion is the better part of valor

It is better to be prudent than merely courageous, as in I'm signing up for the easy course first; discretion is the better part of valor. This proverb, a synonym of look before you leap, was first recorded in 1477. Charles Churchill put it in poetic form: "Even in a hero's heart, Discretion is the better part" ( The Ghost, 1762). Shakespeare also used a form of it: "The better part of valor is discretion" ( 1 Henry IV, 5:4).
See also: better, discretion, of, part

throw caution to the winds

Also, throw discretion to the winds. Behave or speak very rashly, as in Throwing caution to the winds, he ran after the truck, or I'm afraid she's thrown discretion to the winds and told everyone about the divorce. This expression uses to the winds in the sense of "utterly vanishing" or "out of existence," a usage dating from the mid-1600s. The first recorded use of throw to the winds was in 1885.
See also: caution, throw, wind

discretion is the better part of valour

it's better to avoid a dangerous situation than to confront it. proverb

at somebody’s diˈscretion

according to what somebody decides or wishes to do: Bail is granted at the discretion of the court.There is no service charge and tipping is at your discretion.
See also: discretion

diˌscretion is the ˌbetter part of ˈvalour

(British English) (American English diˌscretion is the ˌbetter part of ˈvalor) (saying) you should avoid danger and not take unnecessary risksThis comes from Shakespeare’s play Henry IV.
References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the president cannot discretionally remove the members of the board.
Washington is also one of the first states to adopt the popular "shall issue" license statute that prevents local police from discretionally preventing citizens from exercising their constitutional right to keep and bear arms.
If the result is positive, the variable part of the remuneration will be paid discretionally, within the framework of the profit-share system.
The Group manages nearly $3 billion in institutional commitments to private equity through discretionally managed portfolios of venture and buyouts partnership, and direct investments in underlying portfolio companies.