discourage


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discourage (someone) from (something)

To dissuade or deter someone from doing something. I tried to discourage my daughter from going to that party, but of course she didn't listen to me.
See also: discourage

discourage someone from something

to dissuade someone from doing something. I hope I can discourage Tom from leaving. I do not want to discourage you from further experimentation.
See also: discourage
References in periodicals archive ?
The post US discourages actions that raise tension in the Mediterranean appeared first on Cyprus Mail .
particularly to discourage the unlawful hunting of the most precious and
The bank said that it would soon begin charging large corporate clients and asset managers fees on certain accounts to discourage large deposits.
Lawmakers have said that zeroing in on the youth's limited buying power is a good strategy to altogether lessen smoking prevalence among the 18 to 24 year-old age group and discourage prospective young smokers from initiating tobacco use.
"The electronic auction will discourage collusion and ensure transparency," said the official.
Dr Yusuf Al Sharif, Emirati lawyer and legal consultant, told Khaleej Times that the decision will discourage the private sector from recruiting young Emiratis who are due to join military service.
The sport spice, whose daughter with partner Thomas Starr turned three in February insisted that she would definitely discourage daughter from getting herself inked.
Plant sprouting broccoli, Brussels sprouts and summer cabbage and discourage cabbage root fly by placing collars around stems.
And the majority of respondents also think that this is set to remain the case, as over half of them said they believe Arab governments are unlikely to take measures to discourage such marriages.
"It is a place of prayer, but I would discourage the idea of going off to Knock expecting strange visions.
Byline: Bu Amim says regulations may discourage hiring of UAE nationals
1 : to make less determined, hopeful, or confident <Yet another failed attempt didn't discourage him.>
So I propose that in order to discourage people from having anything to do with public transport we charge them a flat pounds 10 annual fee for a licence, entailing an ID card with photographic evidence, that entitles them to use this cancer that threatens the very fabric of society.
The revised code reduces the maximum lease period from 99 to 49 years, and introduces a system of tax incentives to discourage leaseholders from exporting unprocessed logs.
He added: 'Since we advise that children should be discouraged from using mobile phones, we should also discourage children from placing their laptop on their lap when they are using wi-fi.'