disabuse (someone or oneself) of (something)

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disabuse (someone or oneself) of (something)

To stop someone or oneself from continuing to believe something that is false. After being so ill, I had to disabuse myself of the notion that work is more important than my health.
See also: disabuse, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

disabuse someone of something

to rid someone of an incorrect idea. Please allow me to disabuse you of that assumption. Please disabuse yourself of the notion that you are perfect.
See also: disabuse, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in classic literature ?
The first step of worthiness will be to disabuse us of our superstitious associations with places and times, with number and size.
However, a broader four-dimensional understanding is necessary to disabuse us of the notion that all is well whenever the private sector is active.The private sector is a voter.
Palmer says that unfortunately, we spend the first half of our life 'abandoning [our mission] or letting others disabuse us of [this].' Just think of the expectations we had to meet, the roles we needed to play, not to mention the traumas that wounded us.
He has done nothing since his election to disabuse us of this notion and everything to confirm it.
Statistics, Lower acknowledges, don't tell us all we wish to know--though at least they disabuse us of any notion that only a handful of women participated in the German occupation of Eastern Europe, a fact already expertly explored by historian Elizabeth Harvey, in Women and the Nazi East: Agents and Witnesses of Germanization (2003).
But, to disabuse us of our well-measured sense of justice, listen to how God is described.
A moment's thought should disabuse us of this prejudice.
That is a frightening scenario, but one which Bryant can disabuse us of.
I also think the book could be useful as a text in a course on business ethics, as it successfully works to disabuse us of the idea that simply having a set of ethical principles will be sufficient to making ethical choices.
A careful reading of Paradise Lost will also disabuse us of the notion that Satan is the hero of the poem: "It is not Milton's concept of Satan that has changed as we work our way through the poem: it is the reader's having fallen into his trap of finding in Satan a 'heroic' figure that should have changed, for in life humankind does seem to find evil, immorality, and fairly exclusive selfness attractive" (150).
Filmed in the magazine's New York offices as the staff put together the all-important September issue which marks the start of the style year, Wintour does nothing to disabuse us of the notion she's a terrifying control freak who's never known how to take no for an answer.
Like Freud, she wants to disabuse us of our magical thinking about old age and put in its place the reality principle.
One of Read's goals in his analysis is to attempt to disabuse us of the image of Williams "as an idiosyncratic observer with an extremely heightened, if not exaggerated, sense of his own singularity and significance upon the colonial scene" (104).
He is quick to disabuse us of making any specific connection between yesterday's irregular war (asymmetric, as we call it today) and today's guiding principles.
In Nostromo Conrad's goal is, as Panichas puts it, "to disabuse us of our beliefs in man's natural goodness or in any romanticist, sentimental, or utopian notion of human existence." The decline of Nostromo himself after he hides the cache of silver ingots from the mine is emblematic of the fate of all those who believe that the material progress promised by the mine will surely lead to a better world: "He is a broken, fallen figure whose great inner resources are rotting away as the silver progressively makes him its slave."