dirt cheap

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dirt cheap

Very inexpensive These shoes were dirt cheap—I found them on the clearance rack.
See also: cheap, dirt

dirt cheap

extremely cheap. Buy some more of those plums. They're dirt cheap, In Italy, the peaches are dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, dirt

dirt cheap

Very inexpensive, as in Their house was a real bargain, dirt cheap. Although the idea dates back to ancient times, the precise expression, literally meaning "as cheap as dirt," replaced the now obsolete dog cheap. [Early 1800s]
See also: cheap, dirt

dirt cheap

mod. very cheap. Get one of these while they’re dirt cheap.
See also: cheap, dirt
References in periodicals archive ?
But some experts doubt the dirt-cheap rings will go down well with the girls.
Only ratepayers can avail of local dirt-cheap graves as 'outsiders' have to spend more to be buried within Antrim's boundaries.
And oh, yes - most of these countries offer significant perks to lure filmmakers, from big tax rebates to dirt-cheap labor rates.
Good range of drinks accompany a dirt-cheap menu which changes every few weeks.
The XFi's sad story is repeated across the market, as car companies abandon the dirt-cheap "econoboxes" of yesteryear.
Take away the medal for perpetual dirt-cheap capital, take away the medal for gravity-free stock market, take away the medal for zaiteku financial wizardry, and take away the medal for buying up America.
Most white ones will be ex-cop cars, so avoid unless dirt-cheap.
Deer Hunter 2 - A dirt-cheap sequel to the surprise smash hit.
But if you take out a gold card offering a dirt-cheap introductory deal for the first six months, the cost of long-term borrowing is even lower - at least in the first year.
AEOS obviously operates in the finicky world of fashion, but it`s proven to be a good operator and now appears dirt-cheap.
A LAW against stores selling dirt-cheap booze could be on the way in the war on binge-drinking.
Another story detailing the ``25 most intriguing minds of the new economy'' includes the founder of Bangladesh's revolutionary Grameen Bank and Los Angeles Kings co-owner Philip Anschutz, who also started Qwest Communications, the upstart company whose state-of-the-art fiber-optic network and dirt-cheap prices are threatening to turn the long-distance phone business upside down.
They've just moved from Cheshire and Emma bursts into tears when the penny drops that Glasgow isn't full of dirt-cheap castles after all.