direct

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direct (one's) attention to (someone or something)

To focus on someone or something. And if you'll direct your attention to the docent, she'll start you on your tour of the art museum. When the lights in the theater dimmed, we knew to direct our attention to the stage.
See also: attention, direct

direct (something) against (someone or something)

To target someone or something with something negative. I'm not the one who sabotaged your presentation, so don't direct your anger against me!
See also: direct

direct (something) at (someone or something)

To target someone or something with something negative. I'm not the one who sabotaged your presentation, so don't direct your anger at me!
See also: direct

direct (something) to (someone or something)

1. To designate something for someone. You need to direct that budget report to Mary in Finance.
2. To aim something at or address something to someone or something. In this usage, "toward" is often used instead of "to." Although I directed the paper airplane to my friends across the room, it didn't reach them. Please direct all questions to our Customer Service department.
See also: direct

direct message

A form of private communication on social media sites or Internet forums. It is most commonly used as a verb. Direct message me if you have any questions. If you don't want everyone to see it, send a direct message instead of posting it.
See also: direct, message

Dutch uncle

One who addresses someone severely or critically. Fred is always lecturing me like a Dutch uncle, forgetting the fact that I'm 40 years old!
See also: Dutch, uncle

direct someone's attention to someone or something

to focus someone's regard or concern on someone or something; to cause someone to notice someone or something. May I directyour attention to the young man in the purple costume? The announcer directed our attention to the magician who was coming on stage.
See also: attention, direct

direct something against someone or something

to aim a critical remark or a weapon at someone or something. (Very close to direct something at someone or something.) We directed the guns against the occupied village. Ted said he had directed his remark against Judy.
See also: direct

direct something at someone or something

to aim something at someone or something. (Very close to direct something against someone or something.) Are you directing your remarks at me? Please direct the hose at the bushes.
See also: direct

direct something to someone

to address, designate, or send something to someone. Shall I direct the inquiries to you? Please direct all the mail to the secretary when it is delivered.
See also: direct

direct something to(ward) someone or something

to send, throw, push, or aim something at someone or something. Tom directed the ball toward Harry. Should I direct this inquiry to Alice?
See also: direct

Dutch uncle

a man who gives frank and direct advice to someone. (In the way an uncle might, but not a real relative.) I would not have to lecture you like a Dutch uncle if you were not so extravagant. He acts more like a Dutch uncle than a husband. He's forever telling her what to do in public.
See also: Dutch, uncle

Dutch uncle

A stern, candid critic or adviser, as in When I got in trouble with the teacher again, the principal talked to me like a Dutch uncle . This expression, often put as talk to one like a Dutch uncle, presumably alludes to the sternness and sobriety attributed to the Dutch. [Early 1800s]
See also: Dutch, uncle
References in periodicals archive ?
Hired to direct her in a DVD album of classical music videos-which became a bestseller--he quickly gained her confidence.
When, in 1998, the Monnaie Opera in Brussels invited her to direct Monteverdi's 1607 Orfeo, Brown steeped herself in the music and history of the score.
The measure provides a total of $29.1 billion for veterans health programs, including $26.9 billion in direct appropriations and $2.2 billion in offsetting receipts from veterans and their insurance companies.
Direct medical services to veterans is funded at $22.5 billion, some $1.7 billion more than the fiscal year 2005 level.
"The increase in direct medical services and the emergency funds are a step forward, but they are just a short-term fix to a much larger problem," said National Legislative Director Joseph A.
The spending bill specifies that at least $2.2 billion of the appropriation for medical services be spent on "specialty mental health care." Conferees also directed the VA to designate three "centers of excellence" to focus on mental health care for veterans.
"All in all, funding provided under this measure for the VA is less than adequate, despite an increase in direct medical services for veterans," said Violante.
According to a 1995 survey conducted by the Direct Marketing Association (DMA), direct mail is the medium of choice among businesses, targeting the $350 billion African American market.
In 1995, direct mail and telephone marketing accounted for 64.8% of all consumer direct marketing sales, or $741.7 billion.
Although slightly disenchanted, Fernandes decided to try direct mail shopping again.
In 1995, consumer catalog sales accounted for 6.7% of all direct retail marketing sales, and almost 62% of all catalog sales.
She also finds direct mail more cost-effective for shipping and handling since more than half of her gifts are for out-of-towners.