dip into (one's) savings

(redirected from dip into their savings)

dip into (one's) savings

To take money from one's savings account in small amounts. When my car broke down, I had to dip into my savings to pay for all of the repairs.
See also: dip, saving
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

dip into one's savings

Fig. to take out part of the money one has been saving. (See also dip in(to something).) I had to dip into my savings in order to pay for my vacation. I went to the bank and dipped into savings. There wasn't much left.
See also: dip, saving
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
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References in periodicals archive ?
However, GfK noted the percentage of disposable income being saved was at near-historic lows as households either dip into their savings or go into debt to fund the cost of day-to-day living, adding that "without the security of a savings buffer, consumers may well be unable to absorb the impact of any downturn a no-deal Brexit might deliver".
Nearly a fifth (19%) dip into their savings to cover costs, while 28% feel as though they are running out of money as they wait to be paid.
Many have to dip into their savings to the keep the household afloat with others putting everything on the long finger by using credit cards.
Thus, customer need not dip into their savings and impinge on other financial goals while repaying the loan.
It says that over one third (34 per cent) of respondents did not dip into their savings over the last 12 months, helping consumers build their own savings pot.
More than a third (37%) dip into their savings to fund back-to-school costs, while a quarter (25%) turn to the credit card.
In the face of major medical emergencies, such as heart attacks or strokes, Filipinos will rely more on money from family members, informal loans, or dip into their savings to pay for hospital bills.
Moody's also expects domestic deposits to continue declining as households dip into their savings to maintain living standards.
But fewer people who dip into their savings are doing so to pay down debts.
RISING bills mean households are having to dip into their savings to make ends meet.
ILC-UK, which commissioned the survey with Partnership and Key Retirement Solutions, said its own analysis concluded that this means that one in eight grandparents - around 1.7 million over-55s - believe they will have to dip into their savings to help with tuition fees.
Data from a UK bank informs us that 15 per cent of parents report having to dip into their savings this month in order to finance the necessary outlay for their children to start the new term fully prepared.
Dubai: Rising costs of living are squeezing the monthly budgets of pre-retirees and forcing them to dip into their savings pots just to continue repaying their debts, a new research reveals.
The average amount of savings held by the over-55s fell by 12% from the last quarter to pounds 10,468 - suggesting some people are having to dip into their savings to make ends meet.
Mummy and daddy are being asked to dip into their savings across the country - and a lot of them are doing it.