dint

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by dint of (something)

Due to something. The largely-outdated word "dint" refers to force or effort. By dint of hard work, I was able to get an A in my math class this semester.
See also: by, dint, of
Farlex Dictionary of Idioms. © 2015 Farlex, Inc, all rights reserved.

by dint of something

because of something; due to the efforts of something. (Dint is an old word meaning 'force,' and it is never used except in this phrase.) They got the building finished on time by dint of hard work and good organization. By dint of much studying, John got through college.
See also: by, dint, of
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of American Idioms and Phrasal Verbs. © 2002 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.

by dint of

By means of, as in By dint of hard work he got his degree in three years. The word dint, which survives only in this expression, originally meant "a stroke or blow," and by the late 1500s signified the force behind such a blow. The current term preserves the implication of vigorous or persistent means.
See also: by, dint, of
The American Heritage® Dictionary of Idioms by Christine Ammer. Copyright © 2003, 1997 by The Christine Ammer 1992 Trust. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

by dint of something

If something happens or is done by dint of something else, it happens or is done as a result of it. They got the address from her by dint of much persuasion. He succeeded by dint of sheer hard work.
See also: by, dint, of, something
Collins COBUILD Idioms Dictionary, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2012

by dint of

by means of.
Dint in the sense of ‘blow’ or ‘stroke’ is now archaic, and in the sense of ‘application of force’ survives only in this phrase.
See also: by, dint, of
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

by dint of something/doing something

(formal) as a result of (doing) something; through: By dint of sheer hard work, she managed to pass all her exams.
See also: by, dint, of, something
Farlex Partner Idioms Dictionary © Farlex 2017

by dint of

By means of. The meaning of dint, originally a stroke or blow, gradually changed to signify the force or power behind the stroke. Shakespeare so used it in Julius Caesar (3.2): “O! now you weep, and I perceive you feel the dint of pity.” Today “dint” survives only in the cliché, which is always followed by an explanatory object such as “hard work,” “convincing argument,” or some other forceful explanation.
See also: by, dint, of
The Dictionary of Clichés by Christine Ammer Copyright © 2013 by Christine Ammer
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References in periodicals archive ?
Dints will provide its innovative managed supply chain solution for one of West Africa's largest gold producers.
"This contract is a major step into a new market for Dints, and UKEF's ability to provide innovative and flexible guarantee support has been instrumental in helping us win it - we see a strong partnership going forward with UKEF support," Geoffrey de Mowbray, CEO, Dints, said.
UKEF, Dints' advisor Gabriel Buck of GKB Ventures LTD (GKB), their legal advisors Sullivan & Worcester and their bank, Investec Bank plc (Investec), have developed a tailor made financing structure to support Dints' business model, which they hope to replicate for Dints' other customers.
Louis Taylor, Chief Executive, UK Export Finance, added that, "SMEs like Dints are the backbone of our economy, and we are delighted to have supported this highly entrepreneurial company as it realises its ambitions to grow by selling overseas."
She said: "At 3 o'clock a clappedout run-down dirty and dinted limo drove up.
The accuracy of measurement is lower as the applied forces are weaker (smaller size of the dint).
Then, the diagonal size of the dint left after load removal is measured (Fig.
Vickers' hardness is then expressed as the ratio of the testing load applied to dint area in form of regular tetragonal pyramid with square base and the vertex angle equal to the angle of penetrating body (136[degrees]).