dingy

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dingus

1. n. a thing or gadget. I have a little dingus that helps me clean venetian blinds.
2. and dingy n. the penis; the male thing. (Usually objectionable.) Jimmy, shake your dingus and put it away!

dingy

verb
See dingus

dingy

(ˈdɪŋi)
1. mod. loony; giddy. That friend of yours sure does act dingy sometimes.
2. Go to dingus.
References in periodicals archive ?
Most of his customers are open to trying the Rhone varietal wines, Dingier notes.
Dingier, where the forfeiture rule was not invoked--not because of the state of mind of the defendant when he committed his crime, but rather because the victim's testimony was not a properly taken Marian statement.
In other words, I'm suggesting that we conceive of "the archive" not metaphorically but literally, as in, the dingier part of the library, where our colleagues from the history department are still finding unopened boxes.
and it wasn't at all different from the old world they'd left, but only rather smaller and dingier and more promiscuous.
WE LIVE in an era in which politicians have been relegated to the dingier basements of public esteem, huddled together in the dubious company of car dealers, Z -list celebs, estate agents and journalists.
Everything had to match that damned carpet that just got dirtier and dirtier every year and the drapes and all the furniture--everything just got dingier and dingier as he sat there twenty four hours a day smoking cigarette after cigarette--he went through two packs a day, Just sat there for ten years smoking.
Bobby and his younger companion, Lawson Pines (Gabriel Macht), exist in a rotting old shack in one of the dingier districts off of New Orleans' French Quarter.
It was certainly cold enough to chill right down to the marrow and this result may also have sent a shiver down the spine of Davie Hay, whose side are in danger of disappearing into an even darker and altogether dingier place.
In "Teresa's Wedding," one of his most powerful short stories, the future of the marriage being celebrated is shadowed, and the reception is made to seem even dingier and more pathetic than it already is (the bride is pregnant, the parish priest has been enlisted to strong-arm the reluctant groom into marriage), when the groom's pal tells him an unsolicited and unwelcome sexual secret about his new wife.
But it's a vision that ignores the darker, dingier and more common environs of strip clubs across America, where floors are sticky and crowds make crude demands.